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Sheraton Uptown, Albuquerque, NM, USA
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Wednesday, April 19
 

9:00am

President's Welcome Letter

Welcome to ACCI’s 2017 Conference!

The 2017 ACCI conference in Albuquerque will be a highlight of your year!  Interact with colleagues from across the globe, share and learn about the latest research and policy, support your profession, and investigate New Mexico. 

The planning committee, led by Robin Henager-Greene, and fully supported by our Executive Director, Ginger Phillips and Arden Solutions’ staff, have worked hard to incorporate sessions that will not only expand our profession but also expose us to the unique local culture.  Our named lectures promise to be memorable.

The conference is scheduled around a weekend and is full of opportunities to advance your career and our joint work.  Evenings are free so you can enjoy Albuquerque, especially Old Towne, or extend your stay, hop on the NM Rail Runner Express train and explore Santa Fe (58 miles). 

Our hotel is in the uptown area, a shopping  and entertainment hub. Two malls, the IMAX movie theater, and local restaurants (as well as national chains) are in walking distance. There are local transportation options, including the ABQ Ride bus system which is even available from the airport.

If you’ve not been to New Mexico before, the population includes a strong Hispanic population and significant indigenous population.  The area is known for turquoise and hand crafts of all types.  Critical research on the atomic bomb was conducted here. National parks range from the local Petroglyph National Monument to White Sands National Monument (day trip).  While we will not be there during the famed Balloon Fiesta, you can find a balloon ride.

We have the largest group of student scholarship applicants in recent memory and expect robust student member attendance, so come and meet and mentor the future leaders of our profession.  Expect to see some key longtime leaders, several of whom have not been able to be with us for a while, too.

Irene E. Leech, President, 2017 

 


Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Irene Leech

Irene Leech

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Irene Leech is the current President of ACCI, 2016-17. She teaches consumer studies and advises undergraduate students at Virginia Tech. Earlier in her career I worked in Cooperative Extension for about 15 years. Currently, I am serving as president of ACCI and I have been a me... Read More →



Wednesday April 19, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

Proceedings - Please submit by May 31; Here's How
Please see the attachment for the submission instructions and a sample. These are due by May 31, 2017.


Wednesday April 19, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

Why is the Lead Author Not Listed First?
This Sched.com database believes in alphabetizing everything. Thus, all authors are not listed in the order that you submitted them. The purpose of this App is to provide you with an agenda for the conference. In order to make sure that authors are listed in the correct order, please submit your session (Orals and Posters) to the Consumer Interests Annual (CIA) Proceedings. The template for this is attached and is due May 31. (attachment coming soon)

Wednesday April 19, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA
 
Thursday, April 20
 

8:00am

Nc2172 (invitation only)
Thursday April 20, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Serenade

12:00pm

Board Meeting
Thursday April 20, 2017 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Ebony

6:30pm

International Attendees Go To Dinner Together
Please contact Gianni Nicolini at gianni.nicolini@uniroma2.it for more information. This is a casual get-together and each pays own dinner. 

Thursday April 20, 2017 6:30pm - 8:30pm
TBA
 
Friday, April 21
 

8:00am

Board Meeting Continues
Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ebony

8:00am

Nc2172 Continues
Friday April 21, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
Serenade

10:00am

Registration
Friday April 21, 2017 10:00am - 7:00pm
Registration Desk

2:00pm

3:30pm

3:30pm

General Session 1: Welcome, Colston Warne Lecture, Journal Best Article Award, FRS 1 60-second Previews
  • Welcome - Irene Leech, ACCI President
  • Coston Warne Lecture: Consumer Financial Protection in a Time of Uncertainty - Pat McCoy
  • Featured Session 1 60-second Previews
  • The Cause Cue Effect: Cause-Related Marketing and Consumer Health Perceptions - Issue 50(2), Summer 2016; pp 372-402 - Elizabeth Minton, Winner, Best Paper Award, Journal of Consumer Affairs
About the Colston Warne Lecture:  This lecture will explore the reforms made by Congress in 2010 to bolster consumer financial protection and discuss the future of those reforms under the new Administration.

Moderators
avatar for Robin Henager-Greene

Robin Henager-Greene

Assistant Professor, Whitworth University
Robin Henager, Ph.D. is an award-winning researcher and assistant professor in Economics and Finance in the School of Business at Whitworth University, in Spokane, WA. She received her Ph.D. in Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics from the University of Georgia. Her... Read More →
avatar for Irene Leech

Irene Leech

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Irene Leech is the current President of ACCI, 2016-17. She teaches consumer studies and advises undergraduate students at Virginia Tech. Earlier in her career I worked in Cooperative Extension for about 15 years. Currently, I am serving as president of ACCI and I have been a me... Read More →

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Patricia A. McCoy

Patricia A. McCoy

Liberty Mutual Insurance Professor, Boston College Law School
Patricia A. McCoy is the Liberty Mutual Insurance Professor at Boston College Law School.  Her research interests focus on the nexus among financial products, consumer welfare, and systemic risk.   In 2010-2011, she was the Assistant Director of Mortgage Markets at the newly formed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington, D.C., where she oversaw all of the... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Minton

Elizabeth Minton

Assistant Professor of Marketing, University of Wyoming
Elizabeth Minton is an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Wyoming who conducts research on healthy consumption as well as religion’s influence on consumers and business. She has publications in the Journal of Consumer Affairs, Journal of Advertising, Journal of Business Research, Psychology... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Ambassador/Registry

5:00pm

5:45pm

Awards Ceremony and Door Prizes
Be sure to be here promptly to share in the celebration of ACCI's awards, and win Amazon Gift Cards!

Moderators
avatar for Rui Yao

Rui Yao

Associate Professor, Univeristy of Missouri
Rui Yao, PhD, CFP®, is the current President-Elect for ACCI 2017-18 and an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Personal Financial Planning Department at the University of Missouri. Dr. Yao received her doctoral degree from The Ohio State University. Her research interests focus on helping individuals and households increase financial well-being and, specifically, retirement preparation, financial risk tolerance, investment behavior, saving motives, debt management, and consumption patterns. She received the best paper award from the CFP Board, AARP, American Council on Consumer Interests, and American Association of Family... Read More →


Friday April 21, 2017 5:45pm - 6:45pm
Ambassador/Registry

6:45pm

 
Saturday, April 22
 

6:30am

Registration
Saturday April 22, 2017 6:30am - 4:30pm
Registration Desk

7:00am

Committee Meeting: International
Saturday April 22, 2017 7:00am - 7:50am
Ivory

7:00am

Committee Meeting: Nominations & Elections
Saturday April 22, 2017 7:00am - 7:50am
Wurlitzer

7:00am

Poster Set Up - FRS I
Saturday April 22, 2017 7:00am - 8:00am
Galleria

7:00am

JOCA Editorial Board Breakfast
Saturday April 22, 2017 7:00am - 9:00am
Baldwin

8:00am

8:00am

101-Financial Confidence, Credit Card Use and Financial Satisfaction
This paper investigates the impact of confidence about financial knowledge on financial behaviors. On one hand confidence is necessary to make proactive decisions, yet overconfidence has been associated with a range of negative financial behaviors and outcomes. The role of confidence in credit card choices is unclear. This paper analyzes data from the 2009 National Financial Capability Survey to examine how financial confidence relates with financial knowledge and credit card behaviors. We find evidence that confidence is associated with healthy credit card use and this contributes to financial satisfaction. We also find strong interactions with knowledge to find that confidence increases return of knowledge on healthy credit card use and overall financial satisfaction.

Speakers & Presenters
SA

Stephen A. Atlas

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island
JL

Jialing Lu

Research Assistant, University of Rhode Island
NP

Nilton Porto

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

102-Predictive Analysis of Hospital Characteristics to Inpatient Satisfaction Survey Scores
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandated that as part of healthcare reform, hospital reimbursements from Medicare must be tied to patient satisfaction scores.  The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey is now used nationally as the assessment tool for scoring patient satisfaction.  This study determines the impact of 9 unique independent variables that are utilized in daily hospital operations and their relationship to patients’ perception of care.  The hospital scores were downloaded from the public domain for a 12-month period and then coded against the 9 independent variables.  Multiple regression was run to create predictive models that can be utilized within the healthcare industry for focused work on understanding the drivers of patient satisfaction.

Speakers & Presenters
CJ

Carole J. Makela

Professor, School of Education, Colorado State University
GW

Gregory W. O'Barr

Director, Business Development and Analysis, Cheyenne Regional Medical Center


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

104-Do Academicians Still Prefer Defined Benefit Plans?
This research hypothesizes that faculty with greater financial knowledge will be more likely to select a defined contribution (DC) retirement plan over a defined benefit (DB) retirement plan. Further, the satisfaction with one’s retirement plan depends on the plan type and level of financial knowledge. The study featured a survey of faculty members employed by a university offering both DC and DB retirement plans. As expected, individuals with greater financial knowledge were more likely to select the DC plan. However, those individuals who selected the DC plan were less satisfied with their plan choice. The portability of the DC plan coupled with the individual’s greater knowledge should have led to roughly equal satisfaction levels. Market instability and loss aversion caused lower satisfaction for those in the DC plan.

Speakers & Presenters
BJ

Brenda J. Cude

Professor, Unviersity of Georgia
HH

Heidi H. Ewen

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
avatar for Jessica M. Parks

Jessica M. Parks

PhD Student, Consumer Economics, University of Georgia
Hello! My name is Jessica Parks and I am a PhD student at the University of Georgia. My poster is about how UGA Faculty make a choice between the State's Defined Benefit plan or the Optional Retirement Plan (Defined Contribution plan). I am looking for ways to expand this resear... Read More →
MP

Michael P. Ryan

Associate Professor, University of North Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

105-What Explains Racial and Ethnic Differences in Bank Account Ownership?
Bank account ownership varies considerably across the U.S. In particular, the FDIC (2016) estimates that 18 percent of black households and 16 percent of Hispanic households were “unbanked” in 2015, compared to 3 percent among white non-Hispanic households. This study identifies the key factors contributing to the racial and ethnic disparities in bank account ownership. Specifically, we examine the role of economic circumstances such as income, employment and wealth; other demographic characteristics such as age and household structure; supply-side factors such as geographic proximity to bank branches; and the influence of the communities in which households reside. Our findings will be relevant to policymakers and organizations whose mission is to encourage and support bank account ownership, especially to minority families.

Speakers & Presenters
RG

Ryan Goodstein

Senior Financial Economist, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
AL

Alicia Lloro

National Unbankded and Underbanked Household Survey, FDIC
Alicia Lloro is a Senior Financial Economist in the Division of Depositor and Consumer Protection at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.  Her research interests include econometrics, consumer finance, and transportation economics. Since joining the FDIC in 2013, Alicia has... Read More →
avatar for Sherrie L.W. Rhine

Sherrie L.W. Rhine

Senior Economist, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
JW

Jeffrey Weinstein

Senior Financial Economist, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

106-Education Loan Profile of US Households
This study examined factors associated with various aspects of education loans, such as the size of an education loan and possible repayment problems, to understand the education loan profile of US households. More specifically, for those who have education loans, this study identified the determinants of three dependent variables, outstanding balance of education loans, education loan payment to income ratio, and education loan delinquency.

Speakers & Presenters
EH

Eunice Hong

Instructor, Sungshin Women's University
KT

Kyoung Tae Kim

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
JM

Jae Min Lee

Assistant Professor, Minnesota State University, Mankato


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

107-Family Postponement of Medical and Dental Care: The Influence of Income Level and Financial Hardship
Medical and dental care are some of the most expensive expenditures that consumers incur, and they are also some of the most common expenses that families postpone. The goal of this study is to examine family and financial factors that influence families’ likelihood of delaying healthcare. Findings suggest that middle-income families may be particularly prone to postponing medical care or dental care as a cost saving strategy. Additionally, not carrying adequate and affordable health insurance and experiencing economic shocks like job loss and wage cuts put families at risk of delaying healthcare.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Clinton G. Gudmunson

Clinton G. Gudmunson

Assistant Professor, Iowa State University
avatar for Sara K. Ray

Sara K. Ray

Graduate Research Assistant, Iowa State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

108-Best of Both Worlds: Which DB and DC Characteristics Account for Faculty’s Plan Satisfaction?
Guided by Lancaster’s (1966) Theory of Characteristics Demand, this research hypothesized that certain characteristics (portability, security, etc.) are related to faculty retirement plan satisfaction. A convenience survey asked of 275 respondents their perceived values of Teacher’s Retirement System (TRS) and the Optional Retirement Plan (ORP), information about their demographics, and their satisfaction with their plan. TRS-enrollees expressed greater satisfaction with their current account balance than ORP users. ORP-enrollees most valued the portability of their plan. Sixty-eight percent of TRS users stated that they would not switch plans even if they were allowed to as compared to 33% of ORP users. These results can help institutions looking to implement hybrid plans in determining which characteristics provide enrollees the greatest utility.

Speakers & Presenters
HH

Heidi H. Ewen

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
avatar for Jessica M. Parks

Jessica M. Parks

PhD Student, Consumer Economics, University of Georgia
Hello! My name is Jessica Parks and I am a PhD student at the University of Georgia. My poster is about how UGA Faculty make a choice between the State's Defined Benefit plan or the Optional Retirement Plan (Defined Contribution plan). I am looking for ways to expand this resear... Read More →
MP

Michael P. Ryan

Associate Professor, University of North Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

109-Revolving Credit Card Debt: Do the Determinants Differ Between Bank- and Store-Issued Cards?
Credit cards offer a convenient way to borrow. However, using such cards may lead consumers into a debt trap if they regularly revolve the balance on their cards. This paper identifies two types of credit cards (bank- vs. store-issued) and measures the differences in the propensity to revolve debt and the amounts of revolving debt between the two types. Next, it examines how the determinants of both these aspects of borrowing behavior differ by the type of card.

Patryk Babiarz presenting, Sae Rom Chung not able to attend.  

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Patryk Babiarz

Patryk Babiarz

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
SR

Sae Rom Chung

Graduate Student, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

110-Understanding the Value of Fresno State Wine in the Market
The objective of this study is to increase understanding of the value of the Fresno State brand in the local wine market. The study analyzes the impact of specific product attributes on derived utility and willingness to pay (WTP) for Fresno State wines. A choice-based conjoint analysis is used to determine consumer WTP. Final study results will provide the Fresno State winery, the regional wine industry and academic researchers with valuable information about consumer demographics and wine purchasing behavior. A better understanding of crucial product attributes, consumer characteristics, and corresponding WTP for Fresno State wine will lead to development of more effective market strategies to increase profits; profits that ultimately support and enhance the learning experience of Fresno State students.

Speakers & Presenters
HJ

Haley Jensen

Graduate Student, Utah State University
TA

Todd A. Lone

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Business, California State University, Fresno


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

111-Understanding Perceptions of the Importance of Employer Support in Retirement Preparedness
While there are several mechanisms for financial retirement preparation, employer-sponsored retirement plans have been, and will likely continue to be, a primary vehicle for retirement saving.  As a result, the Baby Boom generation continues to exit the workforce and Millennials enter, an understanding of the value placed on employer-sponsored retirement plans is critical.  To better understand potential generational differences in the emphasis placed on employer-sponsored plans, we first examine differences between older and younger respondents in the importance placed on employer-provided retirement support.  Then, we develop a model to test the hypothesis that those with fewer independent retirement assets will be more likely to place greater importance on the role of the employer in retirement preparedness.

Speakers & Presenters
AA

Angela Akinyemi

JUST Capital
RB

Rene Bautista

Senior Methodologist, NORC at the University of Chicago
RB

Robert Brown

Head of Research, JUST Capital
AF

Angela Fontes

Senior Methodologist, NORC


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

112-Financial Intermingling and Predicting Business Sustainability after a Natural Disaster
Using data from the 2013 Small Business Survival and Demise after a Natural Disaster Project (SBSD), this study investigated factors predicting business sustainability after a natural disaster (Hurricane Katrina). In particular, this study focused on whether financial intermingling of resources influences survival of a family firm after a disaster. The results of the logit model indicate that dipping into household savings was negatively associated with business survival. In addition, physical damage had a statistically significant effect on business survival. The logit results also show that pre-disaster revenue and being in the service industry increased the likelihood that businesses would be operating 8 years after Hurricane Katrina. This study concludes that financial intermingling and physical damage are significant predictors of business survival after a disaster.

Speakers & Presenters
CR

Cynthia R. Jasper

Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
YL

Yoon Lee

Associate Professor, Utah State University
DM

Diane Masuo

Associate Professor, University of Hawaii at Manoa
VZ

Virginia Zuiker

Associate Professor, University of Minnesota


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

113 - Financial Literacy and Confidence in the Ability to Fund an Unexpected Need
Many U.S. families report difficulties covering expenses, paying bills, and setting aside funds for unexpected needs. This study uses data from the 2012 National Financial Capability survey to explore the relationships between subjective and objective measures of financial literacy and individuals’ confidence in their ability to come up with funds if an unexpected need arises.

Speakers & Presenters
DE

Donna E. Danns

Associate Professor of Economics, University of North Georgia
AF

Abigail Fischer

Economics Student, Whitworth University
avatar for Robin Henager-Greene

Robin Henager-Greene

Assistant Professor, Whitworth University
Robin Henager, Ph.D. is an award-winning researcher and assistant professor in Economics and Finance in the School of Business at Whitworth University, in Spokane, WA. She received her Ph.D. in Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics from the University of Georgia. Her... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

114 - Boom or Bust? A Look at How Boomers' Perceptions Compare to Reality
Many baby boomers are approaching retirement and many are likely evaluating their preparedness for retirement. One way to measure how prepared individuals are is to look at objective measures such as financial ratios. Another important measure is individuals’ subjective view of their financial wellness. In other words, how do they feel about their preparation, or lack of preparation, for retirement? The goal of this research is to determine if individuals’ subjective views of their personal finances align with various objective measures. If they do align, how could practitioners help those who have poor subjective views and objective measures? If they don’t align, how could practitioners help their clients deal with this disconnect?

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Chris Browning

Chris Browning

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
avatar for Jacob A Tenney

Jacob A Tenney

Ph.D. Student and Associate Instructor, Texas Tech University
I am a Ph.D. student in the Personal Financial Planning Department at Texas Tech University. I am in my third year and beginning the dissertation phase of my program. My research interests include retirement planning, financial literacy with a focus on financial ratios, and the c... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

115 - Defining Personal Financial Responsibility
This study took the following multi-step approach to investigating personal financial responsibility (PFR): (a) create a PFR scale as measurable construct, and (b) investigate demographic variables as predictors of PFR. Data from the 2009 National Financial Capability Study were used, and the study was guided by Bandura’s (1982) SCT triadic reciprocity to explore the underlying environmental, behavioral, and personal determinants of financial responsibility.

Speakers & Presenters
GL

Gloria L. Preece

Business Lecturer, Kansas State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

8:00am

116 - The Effect of Risk Graphics on Risk Perception of Multi-Risk Options: The Case of Childhood Vaccines
Risk graphics (e.g., pictographs) have been shown to affect risk perception in numerous domains. The present research investigates how the inclusion of risk graphics affects parents' risk perception of childhood vaccines.

Speakers & Presenters
RK

Robin Keller

Professor, University of California - Irvine
RL

Riana Leonhardt

Nurse Practicioner
GL

Grant Leonhardt

Graduate Student
JM

James M. Leonhardt

Assistant Professor, University of Nevada, Reno


Saturday April 22, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Galleria

9:00am

General Session 2 - Esther Peterson Policy Forum, Consumer Movement Archives
Welcome (9:00-9:10)
Esther Peterson Policy Forum: Do Facts Still Matter? Independent Research in the Policymaking Process - Barbara Roper (9:10-10:05)
Consumer Movement Archives - Jane Schillie  (10:05-10:15)

Moderators
avatar for Irene Leech

Irene Leech

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Irene Leech is the current President of ACCI, 2016-17. She teaches consumer studies and advises undergraduate students at Virginia Tech. Earlier in her career I worked in Cooperative Extension for about 15 years. Currently, I am serving as president of ACCI and I have been a me... Read More →

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Barbara Roper

Barbara Roper

Director of Investor Protection, Consumer Federation of America
Barbara Roper is director of investor protection for the Consumer Federation of America, where she has been employed since 1986. CFA is an alliance of approximately 300 pro-consumer organizations, which in turn represent more than 50 million individual consumers. A leading consumer spokesperson on investor protection issues, Roper has conducted studies of abuses in the financial planning industry, state oversight of investment advisers, state and federal financial planning regulation, financial planning software, financial education needs of low income older persons, the need for audit reform in the wake of the Enron scandal, the need for mutual fund reform in the wake of trading and sales abuse scandals, the information preferences of mutual fund shareholders, systemic risk regulation, and securities law weaknesses as a cause of the financial crisis. She has testified frequently before Congress and has supported federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives on a broad range of investor protection issues. Roper is a member of the... Read More →
JS

Jane Schillie

Associate Professor, Kansas State University
MS

Martin Seay

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Ambassador/Registry

10:15am

Break
Saturday April 22, 2017 10:15am - 10:30am
Galleria

10:30am

A1 - Oral Session Focus - Health & Family: Insurance, Socialization, Student Loans, Media Frames
Moderators
MG

Martie Gillen

Assistant Professor, University of Florida

Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ivory

10:30am

A1A-Comprehensive Risk in Consumer Portfolios (Winner of the FP Board's ACCI Financial Planning Paper Award)
Most studies which have explored the nature and determinants of asset portfolio allocations have defined risk in terms of asset price volatility and have ignored the influence of insolvency risk on portfolio choice. The present study adds to the literature by exploring the influence of financial solvency and tolerance for asset price volatility on the shares of the household asset portfolio allocated to classes with different liquidity and risk-reward characteristics. Results suggest that financial solvency risk constrains asset portfolio choices, and that individuals with health problems exhibit a propensity to accept substantial risks by leveraging investments in financial assets with debt. The present results also suggest that financial planners should develop educational materials and assessment tools that explicitly cross-classify debt and asset types to better understand the overall risk exposure of client portfolios. Implications for health policy, retirement income security assistance, and for serving “middle market” consumers of investment advice are discussed.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for David Allen Ammerman

David Allen Ammerman

Financial Officer, National Academy of Sciences
As a financial officer at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., Allen works with research program directors and staff to develop proposals, manage budgets and ensure compliance with federal or other sponsor regulations. Formerly, Allen has been a business unit administrator... Read More →
MM

Maurice MacDonald

Professor, Personal Financial Planning, Kansas State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ivory

10:30am

A1B-Measurement of Affect in Financial Risk Tolerance and its Association with Portfolio Risk
The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which affect (i.e. feelings) was associated with an investor’s portfolio. The Risk-as-Feelings (RaF) hypothesis was utilized to guide the estimation of affect. The risk tolerance estimation error was used as a proxy for affect. The Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Investor Risk Tolerance database was used as a source of risk tolerance, demographic, and investment data. A differential prediction model demonstrated that respondents did exhibit affect. Findings from a multivariate ordinary least square (OLS) regression analysis showed that affect was associated with portfolio, controlling for demographic variables and reliance on professional advice when making investment decisions. Finally, investors who exhibited a positive or negative affect were more likely to have less of risky assets in their portfolio.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for John Grable

John Grable

Professor, University of Georgia
We provide leading-edge teaching, research and outreach that improves the economic well-being for families, increases the quality of life in communities and prepares future leaders and entrepreneurs.Our graduates are entrepreneurs, financial planners, consumer journalists, community developers, and property managers. Our students learn application-based skills to work with people in the real... Read More →
AR

Abed Rabbani

Assistant Professor, University of Missouri


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ivory

10:30am

A1C-An Evaluation of Women’s Financial Literacy through Community Programming
Women and Money: Unique Issues, an Extension curriculum series, is designed to increase women’s financial literacy and capability. From 2012 to 2015, 258 participants completed the program. Evaluations of the 2012 pilot study (n=91) indicated that 100% of the participants learned about unique money issues facing women; 100% of the participants set financial goals; and 97% of the participants developed budgets. From before to after attending the Women and Money: Unique Issues program, 2013-2015 (n=167), participants increased their ability to manage their finances. Paired sample t-tests were conducted. Statistically significant increases in perceived financial abilities were documented across all ten areas that were evaluated by this study. Twenty-six percent of the participants completed a six-month follow up survey to identify financial behavior changes.

Speakers & Presenters
DD

Diann Douglas

University of Florida /IFAS Extension
MG

Martie Gillen

Assistant Professor, University of Florida
LS

Lynda Spence

University of Florida /IFAS Extension
BW

Brenda Williams

University of Florida /IFAS Extension


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ivory

10:30am

A1D-Multi-Generational Modeling of Money Management: Financial Practices Modeled by Parents
Millennials find themselves ill-prepared to meet current financial challenges. Research has shown that the financial knowledge and principles that children retain as they transition to adulthood mainly come from their parents. However, most financial education research has focused on outside sources like public schools. The research that has been conducted on parental education has not yet identified specific principles and practices that are important for parents to model. The purpose of this paper is to begin this exploration. This qualitative, multigenerational study explored what Millennials, their parents, and grandparents remember their parents modeling as well as those that parents and grandparents report modeling to their children. Thematic coding of the interviews revealed three core subthemes: “Acquiring Money Wisely,” “Managing Money Wisely,” and “Spending Money Wisely.”

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Edward Jeffrey Hill

Edward Jeffrey Hill

Professor, Brigham Young University
How parents effectively teach their children about finances.
avatar for Ashley LeBaron

Ashley LeBaron

Master's Student, Brigham Young University
LM

Loren Marks

Professor, Brigham Young University
CR

Christina Rosa

Research Assistant, Brigham Young University


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ivory

10:30am

A2 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Literacy, Svcs, Housing
Moderators
avatar for Rui Yao

Rui Yao

Associate Professor, Univeristy of Missouri
Rui Yao, PhD, CFP®, is the current President-Elect for ACCI 2017-18 and an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Personal Financial Planning Department at the University of Missouri. Dr. Yao received her doctoral degree from The Ohio State University. Her research interests focus on helping individuals and households increase financial well-being and, specifically, retirement preparation, financial risk tolerance, investment behavior, saving motives, debt management, and consumption patterns. She received the best paper award from the CFP Board, AARP, American Council on Consumer Interests, and American Association of Family... Read More →

Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Regal

10:30am

A2A-Who is More Likely to Own Non-primary Residences?
This study used 2013 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study wave 2 data to examine factors related to non-primary residence ownership of Chinese households. Results from this study showed that households with higher income, higher net worth, and with older and more educated heads were more likely to own non-primary residences. These findings have empirical implications for investors and educators.

Speakers & Presenters
SL

Shan Lei

Assistant Professor of Finance, West Texas A&M University
avatar for Rui Yao

Rui Yao

Associate Professor, Univeristy of Missouri
Rui Yao, PhD, CFP®, is the current President-Elect for ACCI 2017-18 and an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Personal Financial Planning Department at the University of Missouri. Dr. Yao received her doctoral degree from The Ohio State University. Her research interests focus on helping individuals and households increase financial well-being and, specifically, retirement preparation, financial risk tolerance, investment behavior, saving motives, debt management, and consumption patterns. She received the best paper award from the CFP Board, AARP, American Council on Consumer Interests, and American Association of Family... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Regal

10:30am

A2B-Factors Associated with Consumer Financial Capability: Evidence from the China Household Finance Survey

We use data from the 2011 China Household Finance Survey to investigate whether employment type and residential status are associated with consumer financial capability in China. Consumer financial capability is measured by the range of financial assets. Results from OLS and Poisson regressions show that people employed in the government-managed system, with urban residence registration, and with non-local rural residence registration have better financial capability than their respective counterparts. The results have policy implications for consumer financial education and supporting vulnerable consumers.


Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Xu Cui

Xu Cui

Visiting PhD student, Renmin University of China/University of Rhode Island
Mr. Xu Cui is a visiting Ph.D. student from Renmin University of China. He will stay at the University of Rhode Island for 12 months, doing research in consumer financial capability and wellbeing with Professor Jing Jian Xiao. Since consumer economics as a field is developing qui... Read More →
avatar for Jing Jian Xiao

Jing Jian Xiao

Professor and JFCP Editor, University of Rhode Island
If you are interested in publishing papers in Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, please talk to me.


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Regal

10:30am

A2C-An Evolutionary Difference Research of the Relationship Between Income Structure and Consumption Structure - Based on AIDS Extension Model
Changing development mode, shifting dynamic pattern and releasing consumer dividend become China’s strategic choice to upgrade economic version and step into stronger economy.  Based on the AIDS extension model, this paper studies the differential evolution of the relationship between income structure and consumption structure from the perspective of time influence and urban-rural disparity. The empirical results show that the impact of income structure on consumption structure in different periods and different groups has obvious difference, and does not follow the discipline of diminishing marginal propensity to consume. Wage income and transfer income are the most important income factors to promote the optimization and upgrading of consumption structure, operating income and property income have certain influence on consumption in certain stage or group. Finally, taking production factors and systems as the basic support, this paper designs driving force model of supply side in which the upgrading of consumption structure can be promoted by enhancing the subentry income.

Speakers & Presenters
HZ

Huifang Zhang

Associate Professor, Xi'an Jiaotong University
YZ

Yaling Zhu

Xi'an Jiaotong University and University of Jyväskylä


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Regal

10:30am

A2D-Financial Literacy of Chinese College Students
Considering the Chinese education system and the values of traditional Chinese culture, the financial education of college students has received little attention. Because the financial sector in China is developing rapidly, it is important for educators to explore the effectiveness of college students’ financial education. This was done by analyzing data collected by the Central University of Finance and Economics. Students were selected from among 10 universities in China. This study fills the above mentioned gap in the literature. Results show that students with a low level of financial literacy did not benefit from the financial literacy education provided. However, students with a medium level of financial literacy improved their score after the education. Parents' education contributed significantly and positively to students' financial literacy score. Credit card ownership was negatively associated with the level of financial literacy.

Speakers & Presenters
CX

Chen Xu

Research Assistant, University of Missouri
avatar for Rui Yao

Rui Yao

Associate Professor, Univeristy of Missouri
Rui Yao, PhD, CFP®, is the current President-Elect for ACCI 2017-18 and an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Personal Financial Planning Department at the University of Missouri. Dr. Yao received her doctoral degree from The Ohio State University. Her research interests focus on helping individuals and households increase financial well-being and, specifically, retirement preparation, financial risk tolerance, investment behavior, saving motives, debt management, and consumption patterns. She received the best paper award from the CFP Board, AARP, American Council on Consumer Interests, and American Association of Family... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Regal

10:30am

A3 - Oral Session Focus - FLEC: Financial Literacy & Education Commission
Moderators
YC

Yi Cai

Associate Professor, California State University, Northridge

Student Moderators
avatar for Jessica M. Parks

Jessica M. Parks

PhD Student, Consumer Economics, University of Georgia
Hello! My name is Jessica Parks and I am a PhD student at the University of Georgia. My poster is about how UGA Faculty make a choice between the State's Defined Benefit plan or the Optional Retirement Plan (Defined Contribution plan). I am looking for ways to expand this resear... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wurlitzer

10:30am

A3A-Barriers to Banking: A Mixed-Methods Investigation of Former Offenders Banking Perceptions and Financial Knowledge
Utilizing a mixed method approach, this study addressed the overarching research question, "How are banking perceptions and behaviors associated with financial knowledge of recently released offenders?" Results from this research revealed that trust, trepidation, prior banking experience, and barriers to banking are among the emergent themes in this study. Implications are provided for policy and practice, such as banking policies to alleviate barriers and simulated financial education activities to inform banking, that could improve inmates' financial preparedness to transition back into mainstream society.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Kristy Archuleta

Kristy Archuleta

Associate Professor, Kansas State University
The Personal Financial Planning unit at Kansas State University strives to be world known for its research, education, service, and outreach in financial planning offering emphases in financial counseling and financial therapy.
JC

Joy Clady

Kansas State University
ML

Meghaan Lurtz

Student, Kansas State University
avatar for Katherine (Kate) S. Mielitz

Katherine (Kate) S. Mielitz

PhD Candidate, Kansas State University
My primary area of research interest is the financial knowledge/capability of transitioning prisoners. I enjoy quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research.


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wurlitzer

10:30am

A3B-Implications of Financial Scarcity on Financial Intervention Participants
Based on the concept of economic scarcity that was used to explain the impact of poverty, current research offers new thinking regarding the needs of consumers who attend financial education initiatives. This study analyzed data from a household training program – an intervention program that intended to bring economic rehabilitation to people who experience financial hardship. First, we evaluated the impact of the program. Later, we identified behavioral patterns and characteristics of participants who differed by their level of income. Although the study is not limited to individuals who are officially defined as ‘poor’, the current analysis attempts to use knowledge from studies of poverty to improve financial education.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Eyal Carmel

Eyal Carmel

PhD Student, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wurlitzer

10:30am

A3C-The Influence of a High School Personal Finance Education Mandate on College Freshmens' Financial Knowledge
This paper reports a study conducted among college freshmen attending a Research 1 university. The primary research question was how exposure to high school personal finance education in a state with a personal finance education mandate influenced students’ financial knowledge. In a hierarchical regression analysis, variables that measured whether students’ high school personal finance education experience was influenced by the mandate explained an additional 1.7% of the variance in financial knowledge; the base model, which included gender and college major, explained 3.6%. Students’ responsibility for their use of financial services (credit cards, debit cards, and savings and investments) contributed an additional 3.4% to explaining the variance.

Speakers & Presenters
BJ

Brenda J. Cude

Professor, Unviersity of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wurlitzer

10:30am

A3D-An Examination of the Effectiveness of Financial Education under Situational Stimuli from a Behavioral Finance Perspective (NEFE Paper Award)
Financial education is found to enhance asset-building abilities of low-income and vulnerable households, and can help improve saving and general financial decision-making (Bell & Lerman, 2005; Lusardi, 2008). However, other studies indicate that financial education programs have limited impact on self-evaluated financial literacy and have little link to better financial behaviors (Mandell & Klein, 2009). The purposes of this study are: 1) to determine whether financial education can effectively improve financial literacy, and 2) to examine whether situational influences on emotions impact the relationship between financial education and financial literacy.

Speakers & Presenters
SC

Swarn Chatterjee

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
LF

Lu Fan

Doctoral Candidate, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Wurlitzer

10:30am

A41-Perceptions and Impacts of Student Loan Entrance Counseling
Research on the outcomes and effectiveness of student loan counseling or the methods and materials used for delivery is scant. Four in ten high debt student loan borrowers couldn’t remember ever being counseled. A one-size-fits-all approach to delivering loan counseling is problematic. The symposia identifies factors associated with the perceived efficacy of entrance loan counseling, explores borrowers' suggested strategies to improve its effectiveness, and investigates the association of the perceived effectiveness of loan counseling with borrower expectations of student loan debt burdens and anticipated difficulty in the ability to pay off debt after graduation. Symposia papers use data from the National Student Financial Wellness Study, a survey of undergraduate students from institutions of higher education across the United States.

Speakers & Presenters
SA

Somer Anderson

Director of the Accounting Program/Assistant Professor of Accounting, Kansas State University and Maryville University
SB

Suzanne Bartholomae

Assistant Professor, Iowa State University
JF

Jonathan Fox

Professor, Iowa State University
avatar for Stuart J Heckman

Stuart J Heckman

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University
JJ

Jesse Jurgenson

Iowa State University
JL

Jodi Letkiewicz

Assistant Professor, York University
avatar for Catherine P Montalto

Catherine P Montalto

Associate Professor, The Ohio State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Baldwin

11:00am

12:00pm

Lunch on Your Own - see link for nearby restaurants
Trip Advisor

ABQ Grill - restaurant inside the hotel
The Egg and I
Chilis
Fork and Fig
Cheesecake Factory
Filling Philly's
Cheese and Coffee
Oaktree Cafe
Cake Fettish
Chipolte
Fuddruckers
Bravo Cucina
Buca di Beppo
Dave and Busters



Saturday April 22, 2017 12:00pm - 1:30pm
TBA

12:00pm

Student Luncheon - Hosted by the Board of Directors
You will fill out an order form before 9:00 on Saturday and turn it in at the registration desk. Then we will join together with Robin Henager-Greene for an informal luncheon gathering. Please do plan to attend. 

Saturday April 22, 2017 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Ambassador/Registry

12:00pm

Poster Set Up - FRS 2
Saturday April 22, 2017 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Galleria

1:30pm

B1 - Oral Session Focus - Coping, Students, Stress, Debt
Moderators
avatar for Sheri Worthy

Sheri Worthy

Professor & Head, University of Georgia
ACCI CIA Editor 2017

Student Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Lehman

Jennifer Lehman

PhD Student and Associate Instructor, Texas Tech University
I'm a PhD student in the personal financial planning department at Texas Tech University. Current research is on diversity issues in charitable planning. I have JD and MPA degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill. I love road trips and have been to all 50 states.


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ivory

1:30pm

B1A-The Influence of Coping Strategies on College Student Outcomes
High levels of stress can negatively impact the completion of a college degree (Murff, 2005), which is often a prerequisite for higher paying jobs and overall increased job satisfaction (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2008). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the coping strategies used by college students and their GPA as an indicator of potential for success. We hypothesized that students with better coping strategies will be more apt to report better academic outcomes as measured by GPA.

Speakers & Presenters
SB

Sonya Britt

Associate Professor, Kansas State University
SC

Seth Castinado

Kansas State Univeristy
CH

Camila Haselwood

Kansas State Univeristy
DP

Derek Potter

Ph.D. Student, Kansas State University
PZ

Phil Zepp

Kansas State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ivory

1:30pm

B1B-Young Adults' Debts and Psychological Distress
Targeting adults aged 18 to 28, this study investigates two questions: First, do increases in student loans and credit card debts cause higher psychological distress, respectively—and if so, to what extent? Second, which type of debt, student loan or credit card debt, lead to higher psychological distress? Five biennial waves (from 2005 to 2013) from Panel Study of Income Dynamics—Transition to Adulthood were included. Results from fixed-effects models indicate that accruing an addition of $1,000 in student loan and credit card debt attributes to 3% and 5% higher likelihood of exacerbated psychological distress. Credit card debt is more likely to attribute to severe distress levels than is student loan. Policy implications on reducing debt loadings among young adults are addressed.

Speakers & Presenters
HK

Hyungsoo Kim

Associate Professor, University of Kentucky
QZ

Qun Zhang

Doctoral Candidate, University of Kentucky


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ivory

1:30pm

B1C-Mediating Effect of Mindset on Coping Strategies used by Consumers Experiencing Financial Hardship during the Economic Recession in 2008
It is well known that experiences of financial hardship are negatively related to quality of life. It is the reason why many researchers have investigated appropriate coping behaviors used during stressful situations caused by financial hardship. An important issue of coping behavior is willingness to execute coping strategies. Willingness is sturdily associated with mindset. Positive mindset leads to willingness to execute the coping behavior, but negative mindset is expected to result in helplessness in coping with a stressful situation. Mindset is expected to be a trigger for evoking an intention of coping behavior. This study has two research goals: (a) to identify the effect of coping behavior on quality of life and (b) to examine the function of mindset on coping behavior.

Speakers & Presenters
LS

Lorna Saboe-Wounded Head

Family Resource Management Field Specialist, South Dakota State University
WH

Wookjae Heo

Assistant Professor, South Dakota State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ivory

1:30pm

B1D-Changes in Household Net Financial Assets After the Great Recession: Did Financial Planners And Other Financial Advisors Make a Difference?
This study focuses on studying the relationship between use of financial planners and other financial advisors before and after the Great Recession and the changes in household net financial assets following the Great Recession using the 2007-2009 panels of the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) dataset. Use of financial planners was divided into four groups: (1) continue to use a financial planner, (2) start to use a financial planner, (3) discontinue to use a financial planner, and (4) never use a financial planner. We examine whether households who utilized the services of a financial planner did better preserving and increasing the value of their net financial assets after the Great Recession when compared with the net financial assets of households who did not seek the services of a financial planner. We also examine whether households who utilized the services of financial planners did better preserving and increasing the value of their net financial assets after the Great Recession when compared with the net financial assets of households who used other financial advisors such as bankers, brokers, insurance agents, accountants, and lawyers after controlling for a number of socioeconomic, demographic, and behavioral factors affecting the financial assets of households.

Speakers & Presenters
LP

Lance Palmer, PhD, CFP

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
SC

Swarn Chatterjee

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
JW

Joseph W. Goetz

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
avatar for Aman Sunder

Aman Sunder

Ph.D Student, University of Georgia
LZ

Lini Zhang

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ivory

1:30pm

B2 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Services: Retirement
Moderators
SC

Shinae Choi

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama

Student Moderators
avatar for Jacob A Tenney

Jacob A Tenney

Ph.D. Student and Associate Instructor, Texas Tech University
I am a Ph.D. student in the Personal Financial Planning Department at Texas Tech University. I am in my third year and beginning the dissertation phase of my program. My research interests include retirement planning, financial literacy with a focus on financial ratios, and the c... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Regal

1:30pm

B2B-Do People with Alzheimer’s Disease have the Proper Estate Planning Preparation?
Advance estate planning can help people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their families. This research investigated the estate planning of people with AD and their families for the presence of: (1) a valid will, (2) a durable power of attorney, (3) a living will, and (4) life insurance using a publicly available dataset, the Health and Retirement Study. We found that people diagnosed with AD were more likely to assign a durable power of attorney for health care than those without AD, suggesting that the onset of a diagnosis encourages attainment of this critical estate planning need for individuals and their families. Research findings can stimulate public discussion regarding AD and estate planning and provide reliable information to millions of people affected by AD.

Speakers & Presenters
SC

Shinae Choi

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
MK

Minjung Kim

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
IM

Ian M. McDonough

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Regal

1:30pm

B2C-Financial Futures: How Working Americans Prioritize Retirement Savings
Understanding why many Americans do not save for retirement is a critical policy question. Research highlights the relatively low rates of access to and participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans. It is possible that Americans focus retirement savings elsewhere (e.g., IRAs), prioritize other savings first (e.g., home ownership), or concentrate on current finances (e.g., debt). Using survey data (n = 2,918), we examine attitudinal and behavioral measures to explore how working Americans prioritize retirement savings. We find that saving for retirement is important, but often liquid savings and debt are higher priorities. Preliminary analyses deviate in surprising ways: Income is rarely associated with prioritizing retirement savings. We posit that multifaceted policy interventions targeting short-term savings and education about retirement income needs are needed.

Speakers & Presenters
AB

Andrew Blevins

Senior Policy Associate, The Pew Charitable Trusts
TG

Theron Guzoto

Research Associate, The Pew Charitable Trusts
JS

John Scott

Director, The Pew Charitable Trusts
AS

Alison Shelton

Senior Research Officer, The Pew Charitable Trusts
avatar for Sarah A. Spell

Sarah A. Spell

Senior Research Associate, The Pew Charitable Trusts


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Regal

1:30pm

B2D-Age at First Job and Retirement Wealth in Later Years
Starting early to save for retirement may require individuals to have a paid or career job as soon as possible. In the United States age at first job, however, has increased over time due to economic conditions and more education opportunities. This study examines how age at entering the labor market is related to retirement saving amounts in later years. Two research questions are examined: Does age at first job affect retirement wealth in later years? If so, to what extent?  Data from the 2012 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is used in this study. The results show that as age at first job increases, accumulated retirement wealth decreases after controlling for demographics, number of working years, and occupation type. To be specific, delaying work start by one year resulted in a $15,345 per year decrease in retirement savings. Our findings indicate that starting to work at a younger age can be channeled into starting to save for retirement at a younger age, leading to better retirement saving outcomes in later years. Implications for policy to improve individual retirement saving amounts are discussed.

Speakers & Presenters
MG

Martie Gillen

Assistant Professor, University of Florida
HK

Hyungsoo Kim

Associate Professor, University of Kentucky
SS

Serah Shin

University of Kentucky
QZ

Qun Zhang

Doctoral Candidate, University of Kentucky


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Regal

1:30pm

B3 - Oral Session Focus - Food
Moderators
avatar for Patryk Babiarz

Patryk Babiarz

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia

Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Wurlitzer

1:30pm

B3A-Impacts of Child Support Policy on Single Mothers’ Material Well-being and Labor Supply
Single mothers often experience more severe economic and social challenges than the two-parent households. The Child Support Enforcement (CSE) enacted in 1975 is a collection of federal and state laws designed to boost an absent parent’s involvement in their child’s life. We extend the previous research by investigating the impact of the CSE policy on the material well-being of single mothers. Utilizing an instrumental variable method, our empirical analysis explicitly takes account of endogeneity of participation in the child support program. Our primary findings suggest that there is a limited positive impact of child support receipt on consumption of market goods and that the single mothers reduce their supply of labor in response to the transfer.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Patryk Babiarz

Patryk Babiarz

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
IH

Ilyar Heydari Barardehi

PhD Candidate, University of Georgia
TM

Teresa Mauldin

Associate Professor Emeritus, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Wurlitzer

1:30pm

B3B-Does the Individual Development Account Program have Longer-term Effects on Food Insecurity?
This study contributes to consumer policy by evaluating the food insecurity of families who completed a rigorous, multi-year, federally funded asset-building program. This study analyzes child food insecurity and household food insecurity and examines the role of the IDA program on either outcome, thus contributing insights to two important policy goals: the success of the federal Assets for Independence Act, and the food security of low-income children. We apply two econometric strategies: Bayesian estimation and switching regression. Bayesian estimation was chosen because it is particularly robust for small samples. We do not find a significant relationship between program graduation or dropout for child food insecurity; however, the average treatment effect was positive and significant for both adult and household food insecurity.

Speakers & Presenters
NK

Namhoon Kim

Virginia Tech
CL

Caezilia Loibl

Associate Professor, The Ohio State University
avatar for Travis Mountain

Travis Mountain

Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech
AS

Anastasia Snyder

Associate Professor, The Ohio State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Wurlitzer

1:30pm

B3C-Increasing Consumers' Fruit and Vegetable Selection: Can Product Bundling Serve as a Behavioral Nudge? (Consumer Movement Archives Applied Consumer Economics Award Student Paper)
This study uses an artefactual field experiment to explore whether product bundles (comprised primarily of fruit & vegetable (F&V) items) can serve as a behavioral nudge to increase F&V selection. Also of interest was whether shopping under cognitive load influenced item and bundle choice, and whether bundles need offer a price discount. A sample of 367 consumers from a Midwestern US city participated during fall 2015 through spring 2016. Participants shopped for groceries under one of six treatments, some featuring bundles. Differences were examined among the proportion of items selected from three categories: F&Vs, Junk Food/Snacks, and Protein/Dairy/Grains.  Proportions were analyzed using a fractional multinomial regression model. We find bundles could potentially increase F&V selection, and may serve as a means through which to lessen cognitive strain.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Kathryn A. Carroll

Kathryn A. Carroll

PhD candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Kathryn A. Carroll is a PhD candidate in Consumer Behavior and Family Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She manages the Behavioral Research Insights Through Experiments (BRITE) Lab, which is an interdisciplinary campus research facility for social sciences. Kat... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Wurlitzer

1:30pm

B3D-Food Price and the Role of SNAP in Improving Food Security and Diet Quality
This study uses detailed food acquisition and purchase records and geographic indicators in the USDA’s National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) to explore how local food prices are associated with food insecurity and diet quality among SNAP participants. Further, this study examines whether the effects of high food prices on either food insecurity or diet quality are improved by SNAP participants’ resource management techniques. The results indicate that higher food prices are positively associated with food insecurity only among the non-participants in SNAP. This study does not find any significant association between food prices and food insecurity among the SNAP participants. This study finds that higher food prices are associated with more vegetables and lower calories in the foods acquired by SNAP participants.

Speakers & Presenters
YC

Yunhee Chang

Associate Professor, University of Mississippi
SC

Swarn Chatterjee

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
JK

Jinhee Kim

Associate Professor, University of Maryland


Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Wurlitzer

1:30pm

B41-Strategies for Bringing Youth Savings Programs into Local Communities
Well-designed economic inclusion strategies can help enhance public trust and confidence in the U.S. financial system. What better way to engage consumers and build trust than to start early through youth savings programs.  To strengthen financial education, promote experiential learning, and further economic inclusion, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) launched a two-year pilot with 21 financial institutions, along with their school and nonprofit partners, to identify effective strategies and promising approaches to offering financial education alongside safe, low-cost savings accounts. Symposium panelists—including a FDIC representative, a participating banker, nonprofit organization, school, and student saver—will be discussing the benefits, challenges, and promising practices of youth savings programs.  This symposium welcomes attendees to join in the conversation about practical ways to promote youth savings through experiential learning.

Symposium Agenda
  • Overview of Symposium Objectives and Introduction of Panelists -- Sherrie Rhine, Senior Economist, FDIC - Moderator
  • FDIC’s Youth Savings Pilot:  Promising Practices and Lessons Learned -- Tracie G. Morris, Outreach and Program Development, FDIC
  • A Banker’s Perspective of Youth Savings -- Arellana Cordero, Senior Vice President of Finance, Southwest Capital Bank
  • A Nonprofit Organization’s Prospective of Youth Savings -- Ona Porter, Chief Executive Officer, Prosperity Works, A Southwest Capital Bank Partner
  • A Teacher’s Perspective of Youth Savings -- Jo Davison, 6th - 8th Grade, Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) Program, Washington Middle School, a Southwest Capital Bank Partner
  • A Student’s View of Youth Savings -- Mayrene Vasquez, 8th Grade, Washington Middle School, Southwest Capital Bank Partner
  • Q&A from the floor  

Speakers & Presenters
AC

Arellana Cordero

Sr. VP of Finance, Southwest Capital Bank
A Banker’s Perspective of Youth Savings
JD

Jo Davison

6-8th Grade, AVID Program (Advancement Via Individual Determination, Washington Middle School
A Teacher’s Perspective of Youth Savings
TG

Tracie G. Morris

Outreach & Program Development, FDIC
FDIC’s Youth Savings Pilot:  Promising Practices and Lessons Learned
OP

Ona Porter

CEO, Prosperity Works
A Nonprofit Organization’s Prospective of Youth Savings
avatar for Sherrie L.W. Rhine

Sherrie L.W. Rhine

Senior Economist, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
MV

Mayrene Vasquez

8th Grade Student AVID Program, Washington Middle School
A Student’s View of Youth Savings 



Saturday April 22, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Baldwin

3:00pm

Break
Saturday April 22, 2017 3:00pm - 3:15pm
Galleria

3:15pm

3:15pm

General Session 3: Karpatkin International Lecture, FRS 2 60-second Previews
Welcome - Joyce Serido 3:15
Karpatkin International Lecture - Food Sovereignty; Food Systems: The Role of Law & Policy in Driving Change in Indian Country - Erin Potter 3:20 - 4:05
Featured Research Session Previews Posters # 201-216 - 4:05-4:25 

Moderators
avatar for Robin Henager-Greene

Robin Henager-Greene

Assistant Professor, Whitworth University
Robin Henager, Ph.D. is an award-winning researcher and assistant professor in Economics and Finance in the School of Business at Whitworth University, in Spokane, WA. She received her Ph.D. in Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics from the University of Georgia. Her... Read More →
avatar for MJ Kabaci

MJ Kabaci

Instructor, Montana State University

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Janie Simms Hipp

Janie Simms Hipp

Founding Director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, University Of Arkansas School Of Law
Janie Simms Hipp, J.D., LL.M. (Chickasaw) is Founding Director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative at the University Of Arkansas School Of Law.  She is an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation.  Prior to launching the Initiative, she served in the Obama Administration as the Senior Advisor for Tribal Relations to Secretary Tom Vilsack, and prior to her appointment within the Office of the Secretary she served in the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA as the National Program Leader for Farm Financial Management, Risk Management Education, Trade Adjustment Assistance, and the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development... Read More →
avatar for Erin Parker

Erin Parker

Research Director & Staff Attorney Indigenous Food & Agriculture Initiative, University of Arkansas School of Law
Erin currently serves as Research Director and Staff Attorney for the Indigenous Food & Agriculture Initiative at the University of Arkansas School of Law, a nationally focused organization serving Tribal communities on issues related to health and wellness, healthy food systems, diversified economic development, and cultural food traditions... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 3:15pm - 4:30pm
Ambassador/Registry

4:30pm

4:30pm

4:30pm

201-Social Service Provider's perspective of Your Money, Your Goals toolkit for Adults with Mental Illness
A cross-sectional survey is used to assess the financial education needs and barriers of adults with mental illness as perceived by human and social service professionals (n=188) attending Your Money, Your Goals (YMYG): a financial empowerment toolkit for Social Services Programs training workshops. Financial education training for YMYG was well attended by social service professionals and practitioners with minimum promotion by MSU Extension. Although the YMYG toolkit was well-received, the findings revealed that social services professionals suggested several adaptations to YMYG for use with individuals with cognitive impairments. Based on the survey findings, the development of a supplemental toolkit to complement the YMYG resource is needed to address the diverse financial needs of those living with mental illness. Supplemental toolkit development and initial pilot testing are planned.

Speakers & Presenters
CJ

Carol Janney

Community Health Researcher; Asst Professor of Epidemiology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
avatar for Brenda Long

Brenda Long

Senior Extension Educator, Michigan State University Extension
SM

Scott Matteson

Extension Educator, Michigan State University Extension
JT

Julie Terhune

Assistant Community Director, Rural Community Health, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
ET

Erica Tobe

Extension Specialist – Financial and Homeownership Education, Michigan State University Extension and Department of Human and Family Studies
AW

Andrea Wendling

Associate Professor and Director of Rural Medicine Curriculum, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

202-Effect of WIC Participation on Future Diet and Health
In this study, we examine whether the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) has lasting benefits for children as they grow. We use econometric methods using a large national dataset to test whether the program’s built-in incentive to consume healthier foods leads to healthier outcomes as children age.

Speakers & Presenters
RS

Robert Scharff

Associate Professor, Ohio State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

203-Intergenerational Transmission of Financial Values Among Mexican American Young Adults
Existing literature on financial literacy and practices generally concludes lower financial literacy and less preferred financial practices among Hispanic young adults compared to their non-Hispanic counterparts. The data for this mixed-method study came from interviews and a survey of young adults living in Southern California who identified themselves as Mexican Americans (n=16). We assessed how and what these young adults learned about financial management from their parents while growing up using axial coding. Overall, these young adults learned a great deal about money management and the importance of putting their family first. In conclusion, what these young adults defined as ideal practices partially match and partially mismatch the conventional ideals.

Speakers & Presenters
YC

Yi Cai

Associate Professor, California State University, Northridge
LD

Lisa Dalati

Graduate Assistant, California State University Northridge
JK

Joan Koonce

Professor, University of Georgia
YM

Yoko Mimura

Associate Professor, California State University Northridge
SP

Scott Plunkett

Professor, California State University Northridge
SS

Stephanie Short

PhD Candidate, University of Georgia
NY

Nefize Yazici

Research Assistant, California State University Northridge


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

204-Subjective Life Expectancy and Consumption Behavior: Evidence from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)
This study investigates how subjective life expectancy affects consumption expenditure among the elderly in Korea. The literature has documented that consumption and saving choices vary with subjective life expectancy in a way that is consistent with the life-cycle hypothesis. This study examines this hypothesis using the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA), which closely follows the sample design of the Health and Retirement Study in the U.S. The main result of this study is that consumption decreases with higher subjective life expectancy, consistent with the life-cycle hypothesis._x000D_

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Patryk Babiarz

Patryk Babiarz

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
YJ

Young Joo Choung

Ph.D. Student, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

205-Do Both Parental and Personal Values and Expectations Influence Young Adults' Financial Behaviors and Well-Being?
The purpose of this study is to investigate the process by which parental and personal financial expectations and values influence young adults’ financial behaviors and, in turn, their financial well-being. Guided by Expectancy-Value Theory (Eccles & Wigfield, 2002), we hypothesize that after accounting for parental factors, personal expectations and values will positively predict financial behaviors and well-being. OLS hierarchical regression analyses estimated the relation of parental factors (values, expectations) and personal factors (values, expectations) to financial behavior (Model 1) and to financial well-being (Model 2), accounting for financial behavior. When predicting financial well-being, personal expectations are three times, and financial behavior is twice that of parental expectations. Interestingly, personal values are predictive only of financial behavior, demonstrating that perhaps values are transformed into behavior.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Sarah A. Burcher

Sarah A. Burcher

Graduate Research & Teaching Assistant, University of Minnesota
After almost ten years in the NonProfit sector, working both directly with families and indirectly by fundraising, I returned to academia to hone my research and evaluation skills in order to empower diverse families and communities through strong programs and policies. Whether w... Read More →
SL

Sun-Kyung Lee

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Minnesota
avatar for Joyce Serido

Joyce Serido

Associate Professor, University of Minnesota
Dr. Joyce Serido is a Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Family Social Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and a leading expert in financial behavior at the intersection of family processes and personal well-being, with particular focus on youth and young adults... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

206-Mental Health and Financial Well-being: A Meta-analysis
This study aims to measure the relationship between mental health and financial well-being. The literature on psychological health including stress, depression, anxiety, and financial well-being is disparate. There is a conflation of the terms for mental health in the literature that makes defining the impacts on financial well-being of different conditions difficult. This study aims to guide the literature going forward by outlining the prevailing definitions in the field of medicine and psychology and an analysis of the existing findings.

Speakers & Presenters
MR

Madelaine Reid L'Esperance

Doctoral Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

207-Healthy, Wealthy, and Retirement Satisfaction among Retirees
The purpose of this study was to examine how health and wealth are associated with retirement satisfaction and to investigate what other factors relate to retirement satisfaction among retired individuals aged 60 and above. Using the 2012 Rand HRS data files, the sample for this study included retired individuals aged 60 and older (N=7,051).  In the HRS questionnaire, respondents were asked, “All in all, would you say that your retirement has turned out to be very satisfying, moderately satisfying, or not at all satisfying?” The responses were: 1 = not at all satisfying, 2 = moderately satisfying, and 3 = very satisfying. The logit results show that all factors regarding health were statistically significant, and wealth was also statistically significant in predicting retirement satisfaction among retired individuals.

Speakers & Presenters
HJ

Haley Jensen

Graduate Student, Utah State University
YL

Yoon Lee

Associate Professor, Utah State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

208-Effect of Unsecured Debt on Mental and Physical Health among Middle-Aged and Older Unmarried Women
Using the 2012 Rand HRS data files, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of unsecured debt on mental and physical health among middle aged and older unmarried women, and to investigate factors influencing the mental and physical health among unmarried women (N=5,227). On average, women in this study held $3,353 as their unsecured debt amount. The findings of this study suggest that that the amount of unsecured debt had a significant impact on both mental and physical health among unmarried women. In addition, the findings suggest that unmarried women with higher income, those who were highly educated, and those who were homeowners had fewer numbers of depressive symptoms and less occurrences of chronic illness.

Speakers & Presenters
YL

Yoon Lee

Associate Professor, Utah State University
AS

Alana Stowe

Graduate Student, Utah State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

209-The Effect of Time Perspective on Debt Behaviors
This paper aims to examine the effect of time perspective factors such as future orientation and present-hedonistic orientation on debt change. People who have a future orientation perspective make a plan for the future with specific goals while people who pursue a present-hedonistic orientation value living for today. The findings indicate that a present-hedonistic perspective is likely to result in the increase in debt even after controlling for the effect of socio-economic features and the experiences of a recession. This adds to the existing consumer studies literature by documenting that dispositional factors significantly affect an individual’s financial status, as well as other economic conditions. Consumer educators can consider this for nurturing desirable economic behaviors.

Speakers & Presenters
NP

Narang Park

Ph.D. Student, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

210-Household Factors related to Decisions to retain Financial Planning Services While Recovering from the Great Recession
This study examines the association between the continuous use, deferred use and a break in the use of financial planning services through the period of Great Recession and changes in risky asset allocations within household investment portfolios during this period. Using the 2007-2009 panel of the Survey of Consumer Finances data set, this study examines whether the portfolio allocation decisions of households who utilized the services of a financial planner, for different periods, were closer to the normative investment behavior when compared with the portfolio allocation decisions of households who did not use the services of a financial planner.

Speakers & Presenters
LP

Lance Palmer, PhD, CFP

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
SC

Swarn Chatterjee

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
JW

Joseph W. Goetz

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
avatar for Aman Sunder

Aman Sunder

Ph.D Student, University of Georgia
LZ

Lini Zhang

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

211-Student Loans, Individual Differences, and Financial Anxiety During College: A Cross-Cultural Comparison
With the collective student loan debt appoaching $1.3 trillion, the need for understanding student loan decisions from multiple angles is paramount. Previous research on student loan behavior has mainly focused on the socio-demographic determinants within a single culture. However, individual differences including regulatory focus, financial literacy and expectations of the economy may moderate the relationship between student loan ownership and financial anxiety among college students. The purpose of this research is to demonstrate a cross-cultural comparison of loan experience and individual differences between two colleges, one in the Midwestern area of the U.S., and the other in Seoul, Korea.

Speakers & Presenters
SH

Soo Hyun Cho

Associate Professor, South Dakota State University
WG

Wei Gu

Graduate Student, South Dakota State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

212 - Multi-dimensional Determinants of International College Students’ Wellbeing: a Literature Review
This is the winner of the Undergraduate Student Poster Competition

Speakers & Presenters

Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

213 - The Glass Ceiling: Current Policy and Suggestions on Creating more Gender Equality
This is the Undergraduate Student Poster Competition Runner Up


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

214 - Innovation in Nutrition Monitoring: NuMo a Mobile App for Consumers
The objective of this research project is to develop a mobile Nutritional Monitoring app (NuMo) that allows consumers to keep track of key nutritional components of their diet based on state-of-the art scientific findings.  While a broad spectrum of nutrients are analyzed, special consideration is given to nutrients associated with cognitive function. This is a transdisciplinary project with team members from computer science, biochemistry and consumer economics.

Speakers & Presenters
WB

Wilson Britten

Graduating Senior Computer Science, Montana State University
ED

Edward Dratz

Professor, Montana State University
HH

Holly Hunts

Associate Professor, Montana State University
EP

Ellie Pennell

Graduating Senior Computer Science, Montana State University
BY

Biiancaa Yeoh

Undergraduate Student, Montana State University


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

215 - Evaluation of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline
Before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) makes its final decision to approve a pipeline, it issues a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). This is the opportunity for landowners and others to point out the strengths and weaknesses of the document. The DEIS for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline contains many assumptions that gloss over or ignore facts.  The procedure used by FERC allows the energy industry to push ahead before meeting all the requirements. FERC and the industry have a system that has resulted in approvals for all but one pipeline since it was created.  Throughout the FERC approval process landowners are disadvantaged.  Changes are needed to make the process fair and ensure that eminent domain is used as intended, only for public benefit.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Irene Leech

Irene Leech

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Irene Leech is the current President of ACCI, 2016-17. She teaches consumer studies and advises undergraduate students at Virginia Tech. Earlier in her career I worked in Cooperative Extension for about 15 years. Currently, I am serving as president of ACCI and I have been a me... Read More →


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria

4:30pm

216 - Financial Strain and Student Loan Debt: Does Financial Literacy Play a Mitigating Role?

This study uses the most recent wave of the FINRA National Financial Capability Study (2015) to examine whether student loan debt increases the financial strain of households. This study also examines whether the financial strain varies by student loan type (federal or private), and whether financial literacy or participation in a financial education course plays a mediating role in this process. The results have implications for both financial educators and policymakers. The significant association between student loan type and financial strain indicates the need for further research to determine the types of private loans that resulted in greater financial strain among households. Additionally, the significantly negative association between financial literacy and financial strain suggests the importance of access to financial education in improving financial well-being of households.


Speakers & Presenters
SC

Swarn Chatterjee

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
BJ

Brenda J. Cude

Professor, Unviersity of Georgia


Saturday April 22, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Galleria
 
Sunday, April 23
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Sunday April 23, 2017 7:00am - 8:00am
Galleria

7:00am

Registration
Sunday April 23, 2017 7:00am - 1:30pm
Registration Desk

8:00am

C1 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Services: Banking, Lending/Borrowing, Alternatives
Moderators
avatar for Dr Andy Schmulow

Dr Andy Schmulow

Founder and CEO, Clarity Prudential Regulatory Consulting, Pty Ltd, Director: Business Law, The University of Western Australia
Andy studied in South Africa, where he was admitted to a BA Honours LLB in the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. He was then admitted to a PhD in the law school at the University of Melbourne. He is an Advocate of the High Court of South Africa, and a Senior Lecturer... Read More →

Student Moderators
avatar for Jessica M. Parks

Jessica M. Parks

PhD Student, Consumer Economics, University of Georgia
Hello! My name is Jessica Parks and I am a PhD student at the University of Georgia. My poster is about how UGA Faculty make a choice between the State's Defined Benefit plan or the Optional Retirement Plan (Defined Contribution plan). I am looking for ways to expand this resear... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Roxy

8:00am

C1A-Everything within Their Power: Anti-Payday Lending Ordinances in Three Communities
As of October, 2016, we are putting the finishing touches on a report for the Silicon Valley Community Foundation on the subject of local ordinances that restrict payday lending. The report describes and assesses successful campaigns in three localities: Salt Lake County, Utah; Dallas, Denton, and Tarrant counties in Texas; and Santa Clara and San Mateo counties in California (“Silicon Valley”).  These three sites were selected because they represent the three states in which local payday ordinances are most numerous and because the states represent different political opportunities and challenges for ordinance supporters.  The ACCI presentation will discuss the highlights of the report._x000D_

Speakers & Presenters
NM

Nathalie Martin

Professor, University of New Mexico
avatar for Robert N. Mayer

Robert N. Mayer

Professor, University of Utah


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Roxy

8:00am

C1B-Impact of Financial Education Mandates on Younger Consumers’ Use of Alternative Financial Services
Financial literacy in the US remains shockingly low: two-thirds of Americans are not able to answer more than three out of five questions about interest rates, inflation, risk diversification, mortgages, and bond pricing. One policy response has been to mandate financial education in schools; however, it is not clear if financial education improves financial capability. This study examined if financial education impacts the use of alternative financial services (AFS) with data from the National Financial Capability Study (2012) and Urban, Schmeiser and Collins (2015). Probability and count data models with state fixed effects were employed to examine AFS use among consumers mandated to take financial education relative to consumers who were not. This study found that mandated consumers were less likely to use any AFS. In particular, financial education mandates are significantly associated with reduced likelihood and frequencies of using payday loans and rent-to-own transactions.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Melody Harvey

Melody Harvey

PhD Candidate, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Melody Harvey is a Ph.D. candidate at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and an assistant policy researcher at RAND Corporation. Her research focuses on effects of social and consumer policies on economically vulnerable populations in the United States. Within the context of ACCI, h... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Roxy

8:00am

C1C-How Do Financial Incentives Affect Consumers’ Intention to Adopt NFC Mobile Payments?
There are three research questions. First, this study addresses whether financial incentives influence consumers’ intention to adopt NFC mobile payment. Second, by comparing different financial incentives (cash back versus discount incentives), this study explores the most influential financial incentive in promoting the NFC mobile payment adoption. Third, this study examines whether consumers’ financial incentives have a moderating effect on the relationship between perceived risk and NFC mobile payment adoption intention.

Speakers & Presenters
SA

Sophia Anong

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
LZ

Lini Zhang

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Georgia
HZ

Haidong Zhao

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Georiga


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Roxy

8:00am

C1D-Who Borrows from Lending Club... and Why do They Borrow?
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) lending is the process of lending between individuals and is one of the oldest forms of money transfer. It occurs as microfinancing or crowdfunding, and online lending is becoming more accepted as a way to borrow. The rise in P2P lending is partly due to recent financial crises and increasingly stricter borrowing rules. Not enough people realize P2P lending is an option, and they utilize more expensive borrowing avenues. Addressing this problem sheds light on a cheaper borrowing option. This paper delivers a profile of who borrows from Lending Club and the reason for borrowing. It uses the 2015 Approved Loan dataset provided from LendingClub.com. We expect that homeowners will get a lower rate than those who hold mortgages or those who rent.

Speakers & Presenters
LA

Lua Augustin

PhD Candidate, Texas Tech University


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Roxy

8:00am

C2 - Oral Session Focus - Saving Behavior
Moderators
QZ

Qun Zhang

Doctoral Candidate, University of Kentucky

Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Regal

8:00am

C2A-From Personality to Saving Behavior: Bridging the Gap (AARP's Public Policy Institute Financial Services and the Older Consumer Award 2017)
This study utilized the 3M Model of Motivation and Personality and employed a structural equation model to investigate an innovative psychological approach to the saving behavior of older consumers. Using a sample of 1,370 pre-retired and partially retired American adults aged 50 to 70, results revealed that financial self-efficacy beliefs facilitated the connection between elemental traits (i.e., openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism), compound traits (i.e., positive affect, negative affect, mastery, and task orientation), and saving behavior. By adapting and integrating psychological theory into retirement saving strategies, older consumers and financial professionals can more fully understand the psychological origins of financial behavior; thereby providing opportunity to tailor retirement saving strategies to individual needs and circumstances.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Kristy Archuleta

Kristy Archuleta

Associate Professor, Kansas State University
The Personal Financial Planning unit at Kansas State University strives to be world known for its research, education, service, and outreach in financial planning offering emphases in financial counseling and financial therapy.
SA

Sarah Asebedo, Ph.D., CFP®

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
MS

Martin Seay

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University
MJ

Melissa J. Wilmarth

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Regal

8:00am

C2B-Tools for Saving: Using Prepaid Accounts to Set Aside Funds
We present the results of a large field study exploring consumers’ use of the Reserve “set aside” feature on the American Express Serve prepaid card. The study aimed to address two key questions: 1) Can certain strategies encourage consumer saving behavior; and 2) Is saving behavior associated with better outcomes for consumers, particularly for low-income and underserved consumers? Results from the pilot indicate that, in particular, offering customers a $10 incentive for using the savings feature during a 12-week period was highly effective at encouraging enrollment in the savings feature. In addition, results from a survey showed that participants who were sent an incentive offer as part of the messaging reported statistically significantly less payday loan use compared to those in the control group.

Speakers & Presenters
CC

Cheryl Cooper

Research Analyst, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Regal

8:00am

C2C-Is Debt Good or Bad for a Comfortable Retirement? Exploring the Relationship between Consumer Debt and Retirement Preparedness
We use data from a nationally-representative sample to explore the relationship between people’s consumer debt patterns and their retirement savings and planning behavior. Specifically, we examine the impact of having secured and non-secured debt on a novel retirement-preparedness index as well as self-assessed retirement preparedness. Our findings suggest that people with non-secured debt save and plan less for retirement, and also report feeling less financially-prepared for retirement. Having secured debt, on the other hand, correlates positively with retirement savings and planning behavior. We discuss plausible explanations for these and other relationships for different segments of the population. We also discuss limitations of this research and highlight the importance of considering consumer debt within the overall scheme of financial wellbeing and retirement security.

Speakers & Presenters
LA

Laith Alattar

Social Science Research Analyst, Social Security Administration
DR

David Rogofsky

Social Security Administration


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Regal

8:00am

C2D-Are Millennials Saving for Retirement?
As the nation’s largest generation, Millennials have outnumbered baby-boomers by approximately 0.5 million in 2016. Unlike their parents and grandparents, Millennials are expected to shoulder more responsibilities to financially prepare for their retirement. Given the uncertain future payouts of Social Security, the popularity of DC (defined contribution) plans versus DB (defined benefit) plans, and the increasing longevity, it is crucial that Millennials start saving for their retirement early in their career. As DC plans become a more important source of retirement income, the risk of securing an adequate standard of living in retirement has shifted to individuals. Unlike DB plan participants, individuals who are eligible to participate in a DC plan face three decisions: 1) whether to participate; 2) to what degree to participate; and 3) how to allocate their plan assets. Strategic and disciplined savings and investments have become more important than ever. _x000D_

Although many prior studies have been conducted to analyze the retirement readiness for baby-boomers generation, very few focused on the Millennials generation’s retirement preparation. By using the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) dataset, this study focuses on analyzing Millennials’ ownership of and asset allocation in accounts that are earmarked for retirement purposes such as their Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) and DC plans. Factors that contribute to the account balance and asset allocation in these accounts are examined as well.

Speakers & Presenters
GC

Guopeng Cheng

University of Missouri
avatar for Rui Yao

Rui Yao

Associate Professor, Univeristy of Missouri
Rui Yao, PhD, CFP®, is the current President-Elect for ACCI 2017-18 and an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Personal Financial Planning Department at the University of Missouri. Dr. Yao received her doctoral degree from The Ohio State University. Her research interests focus on helping individuals and households increase financial well-being and, specifically, retirement preparation, financial risk tolerance, investment behavior, saving motives, debt management, and consumption patterns. She received the best paper award from the CFP Board, AARP, American Council on Consumer Interests, and American Association of Family... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Regal

8:00am

C3 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Services: Home Ownership, Insurance, Low Income
Moderators
avatar for Stuart J Heckman

Stuart J Heckman

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University

Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Wurlitzer

8:00am

C3A-Nutrition Label Reading and Positive Financial Behavior
The study explored relationships between the practice of reading Nutrition Facts labels on foods and beverages and performance of ten positive personal finance practices. Data came from a 20-question online quiz that provides a simultaneous assessment of individuals’ health and financial practices. The data set included 3,361 observations from U.S. residents. OLS linear regressions used the score of financial behaviors as a dependent variable. Model 1 included only nutrition label reading as the independent variable that was positively associated with the financial behavior score. Model 2 added demographic characteristics as control variables and nutrition label reading behavior was still positively associated with financial behavior. Support was found for the hypothesis that respondents who report frequent nutrition label reading have higher financial behavior scores than others.

Speakers & Presenters
KE

Karen Ensle

Family and Community Health Sciences Educator, Rutgers University
avatar for Barbara O'Neill

Barbara O'Neill

Professor, Rutgers University
avatar for Jing Jian Xiao

Jing Jian Xiao

Professor and JFCP Editor, University of Rhode Island
If you are interested in publishing papers in Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, please talk to me.


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Wurlitzer

8:00am

C3C-Adverse Selection in Private Health Insurance
In health insurance, adverse selection relates to the fact that unhealthy people who need health care are more likely to take out health insurance than healthy people. Insurers will set premiums partly based on the expected claims of subscribers, especially to cover the potentially higher risk of less healthy consumers. This year, private health insurance premiums in Australia have increased since April 2016 by an average of 5.6%. In the context of population ageing and chronic diseases in Australia, this paper examines the private health insurance market in Australia and offers some general insights regarding risk selection of the insured pool, focusing initially on customers with long-term health conditions and health-risk characteristics.

Speakers & Presenters
LT

Lan Thi Phuong Nguyen

PhD candidate, Griffith University


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Wurlitzer

8:00am

C3D-Understanding Consumer Perceptions of Fairness in High Risk Areas
This analysis seeks to understand how consumers perceive fairness in the pricing of home insurance premiums, particularly related to the number of claims and residence in high risk areas.  Data from 658 homeowners in the state of Louisiana are analyzed to better understand the economic, demographic, and policy specific factors in perceived premium fairness.

Speakers & Presenters
RB

Rene Bautista

Senior Methodologist, NORC at the University of Chicago
AF

Angela Fontes

Senior Methodologist, NORC
MN

Melissa Newberry

State Farm Insurance


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Wurlitzer

8:00am

C41-Families, Food, and Fledglings: Works in Progress Using Consumer Expenditure Survey Data
The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) is the most detailed source of expenditure, income, asset and liability, and demographic data collected directly from households by the Federal government.  Tabular and microdata from the CE are available for free download from this national sample.  This session features works-in-progress using these data to assess economic status of different consumers. The first describes parental expenditures for children. The second examines relationships between income and restaurant choices (full service, fast food, etc.). The third examines the changing characteristics and food expenditures for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants before, during, and after the recent recession, both in NYC and nationwide. The fourth compares young adults (so-called “Millennials”) today to young adults 10 years ago to assess the effects of the recession.

Speakers & Presenters
LB

Lisa Boily

Bureau of Labor Statistics
CG

Cynthia Gillham

Independent researcher
DM

Donka Mirtcheva

The College of New Jersey
avatar for Geoffrey Paulin

Geoffrey Paulin

Senior Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics
Geoffrey Paulin, Ph.D., is a Senior Economist in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Surveys (CE) program. He has written numerous articles using various aspects of the CE data, which have been published in periodicals such as  Journal of Consumer Affairs, for which he serves as a member of the Editorial Board, Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, and the Monthly Labor... Read More →
AR

Arcenis Rojas

Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics
TW

Taylor Wilson

Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics


Sunday April 23, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Baldwin

9:30am

Break
Sunday April 23, 2017 9:30am - 9:45am
Galleria

9:45am

D1 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Literacy: Caribbean, Military, Planning Behavior, Pipeline Impact
Moderators
DE

Donna E. Danns

Associate Professor of Economics, University of North Georgia

Student Moderators
MX

Minhong Xu

PhD student, University of Illinois


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Wurlitzer

9:45am

D1A-Propensity to Plan, Financial Capability, and Financial Satisfaction
To better understand consumer planning behavior, this study examined factors associated with the propensity to plan, the association between the propensity to plan and financial capability, and the association between the propensity to plan and financial satisfaction, a subjective measure of financial well-being. Compared to previous research on the propensity to plan with sample limitations, this study used data from the 2015 National Financial Capability Study, a large, nationally representative sample, to examine demographic and financial factors associated with the propensity to plan and potential effects of the propensity to plan on financial capability and financial satisfaction. The results show that there are demographic and financial differences in being a self-planner and the propensity to plan is positively associated with financial capability factors and financial satisfaction. The findings are unique, enrich the literature of consumer finance, and have implications for financial service professionals to better serve consumers.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Barbara O'Neill

Barbara O'Neill

Professor, Rutgers University
avatar for Jing Jian Xiao

Jing Jian Xiao

Professor and JFCP Editor, University of Rhode Island
If you are interested in publishing papers in Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, please talk to me.


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Wurlitzer

9:45am

D1B-Environmental Hazard and Consumers' Credit Access (Richard L. D. Morse Applied Consumer Economics Award - Professonal Paper)
This paper examines the effects of pipeline infrastructure and associated incidents on mortgage consumers using evidence from 2005-2011 Home Mortgage Disclosure Act loans in Texas. Empirical results of a difference-in-difference approach show a permanently lower origination rate by 1.6% in the pipeline-present areas compared to the pipeline-free areas, which further enlarges by 1.8% whenever new incidents happen. The treatment effects of incidents emerge only among low- to middle-income consumers and not among high-income consumers. This study informs the public discourse about pipeline hazards and identifies the population at risk of social welfare loss.

Speakers & Presenters
MX

Minhong Xu

PhD student, University of Illinois
YX

Yilan Xu

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Wurlitzer

9:45am

D1C-Financial Behaviors of Military Households: The Role of Financial Literacy and Financial Education
This study explores financial behaviors of military households in the U.S. in two ways; long-term and short-term financial behaviors. We mainly investigate the role of financial literacy and financial education on financial behaviors as salient factors. Empirical results from the 2015 National Financial Capability Study (NFCS) will provide an important insight into policymakers as well as financial practitioners.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Robin Henager-Greene

Robin Henager-Greene

Assistant Professor, Whitworth University
Robin Henager, Ph.D. is an award-winning researcher and assistant professor in Economics and Finance in the School of Business at Whitworth University, in Spokane, WA. She received her Ph.D. in Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics from the University of Georgia. Her... Read More →
KT

Kyoung Tae Kim

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
MJ

Melissa J. Wilmarth

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Wurlitzer

9:45am

D1D-Developing Financial Literacy in the Caribbean
There has been increased interest by many countries in developing the financial literacy of their citizens. These efforts have been propelled in part by the need to increase individual financial responsibility as a consequence of the global economic crisis, technological innovations in financial markets, and the changing nature of financial products. The World Bank and other international institutions are in the vanguard of a campaign for improving financial literacy worldwide. Some countries have responded positively, instituting varied financial and economic education programs. Using interviews, website content analysis, and secondary sources, this paper examines recent efforts in developing financial literacy for selected Caribbean countries; highlights their delivery methods; and pinpoints the role of the international, regional, and national organizations in increasing the financial literacy of citizens in these countries.

Speakers & Presenters
GK

George K. Danns

Professor of Sociology, University of North Georgia
DE

Donna E. Danns

Associate Professor of Economics, University of North Georgia


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Wurlitzer

9:45am

D2 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Literacy, Svcs, Behavior: Debt, Risk, Bankruptcy, Low Income
Moderators
avatar for Robin Henager-Greene

Robin Henager-Greene

Assistant Professor, Whitworth University
Robin Henager, Ph.D. is an award-winning researcher and assistant professor in Economics and Finance in the School of Business at Whitworth University, in Spokane, WA. She received her Ph.D. in Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics from the University of Georgia. Her... Read More →

Student Moderators
AF

Abigail Fischer

Economics Student, Whitworth University


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Regal

9:45am

D2A-Exploring Financial Behaviors and Attitudes of Low Income Households in the United States
This research is designed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of various financial behaviors and attitudes of low income households who may face severe economic vulnerability after the Great Recession.  Results from the 2010 and 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances showed that households in severe poverty (100% of poverty threshold or less) were less likely to save, more likely to own stock, less likely to own a home, less likely to have ever filed for bankruptcy, less likely to have debt, and more likely to have debt delinquency compared to those in less severe poverty level.  Financial advisors working with low-income households could disseminate information regarding the risk factors in an effort to help households become more knowledgeable of such risks and perhaps avoid such financial difficulties.

Speakers & Presenters
KT

Kyoung Tae Kim

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Regal

9:45am

D2B-Exploring Consumers' Financial Fragility in Europe: Over-indebtedness, Rainy Days Funds, and the Role of Financial Literacy
This study analyses the financial fragility of individuals in Europe. Using data from a 2015 survey with more than 1,000 observations, both the excess of borrowing related with the over-indebtedness phenomena and the lack of funds for "rainy days" are analyzed in order to investigate the presence of specific groups within the population that are more likely to sink into a financially fragile status as a result of struggling with their finances. The role of financial literacy in explaining such phenomena is taken into account.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Gianni Nicolini

Gianni Nicolini

Associate Professor, University of Rome


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Regal

9:45am

D2C-Subjective Survival Expectation and Portfolio Choice: Evidence of Interplay between Probabilistic Reasoning and Cognitive Ability
Conflicting views towards human cognitive processes are not new, but such discussion is often neglected in household finance. Our study then fills the gap by examining the evidence of Bayesian reasoning in predicting subjective survival probability and its impact on portfolio choice. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we find population-wide evidence that individuals refer to their perceived chance of survival when allocating savings to risky and riskless assets. More importantly, we find that heuristic decision-makers, predominantly individuals with limited cognitive resources, are less likely to engage in statistical inference, less efficiently encode new information, and rely on a rough guess to make an intertemporal choice.

Speakers & Presenters
TP

Tae-Young Pak

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
SH

Su Hyun Shin

Assistant Professor, The University of Alabama


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Regal

9:45am

D2D-Preventing Reckless and Predatory Lending, Particularly to the most Vulnerable in Society: An Innovative and Strongly Consumer Centric Approach from South Africa
This session will analyse the South African National Credit Act, enacted to combat reckless and predatory lending. Overall, a highly progressive regime, aimed squarely at protecting the most vulnerable financial consumers, of which there are many (due to low levels of income, education and literacy). The South African legislation is, in many respects, ground-breaking, and has been widely acknowledged as, among other things, having protected the South African financial system from the ravages of the global financial crisis. The South African legislation is, therefore, of significance not only for consumer protection, but for overall financial system stability as well. Included will be some comparative analysis with the Australian regime.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Dr Andy Schmulow

Dr Andy Schmulow

Founder and CEO, Clarity Prudential Regulatory Consulting, Pty Ltd, Director: Business Law, The University of Western Australia
Andy studied in South Africa, where he was admitted to a BA Honours LLB in the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. He was then admitted to a PhD in the law school at the University of Melbourne. He is an Advocate of the High Court of South Africa, and a Senior Lecturer... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Regal

9:45am

D3- Oral Session Focus - Financial Literacy and Services
Moderators
avatar for Jane Kolodinsky

Jane Kolodinsky

Professor and Chair, University of Vermont
I conduct research and evaluation in the areas of food systems, community economic development and social well being.

Student Moderators
avatar for Katherine (Kate) S. Mielitz

Katherine (Kate) S. Mielitz

PhD Candidate, Kansas State University
My primary area of research interest is the financial knowledge/capability of transitioning prisoners. I enjoy quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research.


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Roxy

9:45am

D3A-Financial Gender Gaps
Utilizing two multinomial logit regressions, one with financial literacy (proxied by financial sophistication) and one without, this study addressed the overarching research question, will the financial gender gap remain after using financial literacy as a mediator in predicting risky asset holdings? Results from the study revealed that when financial literacy was a part of the model the financial gender gap was weak. Meaning, when financial literacy is considered, men and women holding risky assets are not statistically different from each other. Implications are provided for policy and education. Future programs should contain more behavior modification components and consider dropping any emphasis on the male/female distinction.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Stuart J Heckman

Stuart J Heckman

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University
ML

Meghaan Lurtz

Student, Kansas State University


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Roxy

9:45am

D3B-Media Frames and their Influence for Sugary Drink Taxes
This study examines the relationship between the media framing about a sugary drink tax bill introduced in a northeast state and the support/opposition of citizens regarding the tax. Framing is the process of emphasizing or including certain points, while excluding others. A sample of newspaper, television, and radio media stories were frame coded using content analysis.  Neutral frames were identified 40 percent of the time. These grouped data were combined with individual data obtained from a representative sample of adult citizens in each of the three years. The prevalence of pro- and anti-tax frames for a three year period (2013-2015) were included in model to estimate the log-odds of favoring/opposing a sugary drink tax, controlling for several demographic characteristics. Ceteris Paribus, increases in the number of positive frames increased support for the tax, while increases in negative frames decreased support. Media matters.

Speakers & Presenters
BC

Benjamin Crosby

Analyst, University of Vermont
avatar for Jane Kolodinsky

Jane Kolodinsky

Professor and Chair, University of Vermont
I conduct research and evaluation in the areas of food systems, community economic development and social well being.


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Roxy

9:45am

D3C-The Effect of Health Insurance Coverage and Subjective Health Status on Individual Estimates of Life Expectancy
Given the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA), most Americans are now required to carry health insurance. We examine the influence of health insurance coverage, and perceived health status on individual estimates of life expectancy using the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances (N = 6,015). We find that health insurance coverage does not influence subjective life expectancy nor does it influence one’s belief that they will live beyond the IRS’ actuarial table estimates. However, we find that perceived health status is significant, and positively associated with SLE, both as a continuous measure and as a predictor of whether or not an individual will live beyond actuarial table estimates, indicating that financial planners should consider their client’s perceived health status when engaging in the financial planning process.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Stuart J Heckman

Stuart J Heckman

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University
DR

Derek R Lawson

Ph.D. Student, Kansas State University


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Roxy

9:45am

D3D-The Impact of Student Loans on Health-related Obligations
The study investigates the relationship between student loan burden and the likelihood of hardship in meeting health care costs. The likelihood of having past due medical bills in the previous 12 months, and the likelihood of avoiding health care services in the previous 12 months by not purchasing prescribed medication, skipping tests or follow-up with a doctor or not seeking care for a medical problem because of the cost were examined. Student loan hardship was being on an income-scaled repayment plan or having paid late in the last 12 months. We show that when we consider budget constraints, leveraging student loans can become problematic with unintended consequences in affording and accessing health care, which counteracts the pursuit of overall well-being under the human capital model.

Speakers & Presenters
SA

Sophia Anong

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Roxy

9:45am

D41-Innovative Data Collection in Social Science Research
Six researchers from different universities will fill a panel and be asked questions by a moderator. Questions will be based on data collection methods used by a large multi-state research team over the last several years. Methods will be introduced (using online survey companies, online experiments, online focus groups, and Twitter chats), discussion of lessons learned, and other data collection methods we are considering for the future. Audience participation will be encouraged with “questions for the audience” during each section of the symposia and there will be an open Q&A at the end.

Speakers & Presenters
DA

David A. Evans

Extension Specialist, Purdue University
CL

Carrie L Johnson

Assistant Professor & Extension Specialist, North Dakota State University
DE

D Elizabeth Kiss

Associate Professor, Kansas State University
avatar for Barbara O'Neill

Barbara O'Neill

Professor, Rutgers University
YX

Yilan Xu

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois


Sunday April 23, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Baldwin

11:15am

Luncheon and General Session 4: Business Meeting, Journal Editors Report
Eat Lunch 11:15 - 12:00
ACCI Annual Business Meeting 12:00 - 12:45 
  • Minutes 2016 Annual Meeting
  • President's Welcome and Address
  • Treasurer's Report
  • Executive Director's Report
  • Editor's Report, Journal of Consumer Affairs
  • Recognition of Service to ACCI
  • Introduce 2017-18 Officers and Board
  • Looking Forward to 2017-18

Moderators
avatar for MJ Kabaci

MJ Kabaci

Instructor, Montana State University
avatar for Irene Leech

Irene Leech

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Irene Leech is the current President of ACCI, 2016-17. She teaches consumer studies and advises undergraduate students at Virginia Tech. Earlier in her career I worked in Cooperative Extension for about 15 years. Currently, I am serving as president of ACCI and I have been a me... Read More →

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Irene Leech

Irene Leech

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Irene Leech is the current President of ACCI, 2016-17. She teaches consumer studies and advises undergraduate students at Virginia Tech. Earlier in her career I worked in Cooperative Extension for about 15 years. Currently, I am serving as president of ACCI and I have been a me... Read More →
avatar for Sharon Tennyson

Sharon Tennyson

Editor, Journal of Consumer Affairs
Sharon Tennyson is a Professor at Cornell University in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management, and Director of the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA).  Her primary research focus is the impact of laws and government regulations on the wellbeing of consumers in markets. Recognizing that government actions may alter firms' operations and/or consumers' decisions in markets, her work explores the effects of regulations on these behaviors and the changes in market outcomes that result... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 11:15am - 12:45pm
Ambassador/Registry

1:00pm

E1 - Oral Session Focus - Student Loans and Stress
Moderators
JL

Jodi Letkiewicz

Assistant Professor, York University

Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Wurlitzer

1:00pm

E1A-Financial Anxiety of First Generation College Students
Both financial anxiety and first-generation student status have been linked to negative outcomes among college students. Students suffering from financial stress often have higher levels of student loan debt, own more credit cards, work longer hours, and demonstrate higher levels of attrition. First-generation students may prioritize working over academics, and they tend to have lower GPAs and higher rates of attrition. This research examines the predictors of financial anxiety for first-generation and later-generation students using the Roy Adaptation Model and data from a large Midwestern public university. Regression analyses revealed that first-generation student participants had higher levels of financial stress, and that they did not experience the same reduction in stress that their counterparts did as a result of maintaining social connections. Both first-generation and later-generation students' anxiety was significantly associated with levels of perceived mastery, peer financial comparisons, perceptions of income adequacy, gender, subjective financial knowledge, and working status during school.

Speakers & Presenters
SB

Sonya Britt

Associate Professor, Kansas State University
DJ

David Jayne

Kansas State University
DP

Derek Potter

Ph.D. Student, Kansas State University


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Wurlitzer

1:00pm

E1B-Financial Literacy, College lifestyle, and Student Loan Decision Making
Using data from the 2014-2015 National Student Financial Wellness Study with 5,444 student-loan borrowers from 50 universities in the United States, this study examines the effects of financial literacy and student college lifestyle on use of various decision-making strategies when borrowing for higher education. Findings suggest that financial literacy, and to a lesser extent college student lifestyle, predicted the odds of 1) considering past loan amounts, 2) considering future debt load, 3) borrowing the least possible, 4) planning using a budget, and 5) borrowing the maximum amount. Lifestyle factors associated with these outcomes included, living in a fraternity/sorority, being an athlete, and GPA.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Clinton G. Gudmunson

Clinton G. Gudmunson

Assistant Professor, Iowa State University


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Wurlitzer

1:00pm

E1C-Trends in Student Loan Attitudes and Higher Education Attainment
Higher education financing decisions have attracted an unprecedented amount of attention from popular media, consumers, policymakers, and administrators. The growth in borrowing behavior, both in frequency and intensity, has led to concerns that institutions are ripping students off and that students are making poor choices. The objective of this study is to trace attitudes about student debt over time and to determine the causal effect of loan attitudes on higher education attainment. Using the Survey of Consumer Finances and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we (1) explore how student loan debt attitudes have changed over time in both the general population and within subgroups and (2) estimate the impact of debt attitudes on higher education attainment.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Stuart J Heckman

Stuart J Heckman

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University
KJ

Kenneth John White, Jr.

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
JL

Jodi Letkiewicz

Assistant Professor, York University


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Wurlitzer

1:00pm

E1D-inancial Burden, Perceived Capability, and Young Adults' Well-being: Evidence From a Multi-year Panel Study
The purpose of the current study is to examine the debt burdens, perceived financial capability, and the physical as well as psychological well-being of young adults. This study uses a panel data constructed from the 2009-2013 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)-Transition to Adulthood (TA) supplement. Results from this study suggest that after controlling for other factors, the amount of revolving debt is negatively associated with flourishing psychological state of young adults. Amount of credit card debt is also negatively associated with improving mental health of young adults. Perceived capabilities in being able to manage one’s finances, solve problems, and being responsible were significant and positively associated with both flourishing mental health as well as self-reported excellent health among young adults.

Speakers & Presenters
SC

Swarn Chatterjee

Associate Professor, University of Georgia
JK

Jinhee Kim

Associate Professor, University of Maryland


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Wurlitzer

1:00pm

E2 - Oral Session Focus - Financial Services: Charitable Giving, Risk
Moderators
SH

Su Hyun Shin

Assistant Professor, The University of Alabama

Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Regal

1:00pm

E2A-Source of Information and Selection of Financial Instruments
Do financial professionals affect how a household allocates money between financial instruments? If so, in what ways? While there is evidence of a correlation between the use of financial advice and improved financial outcomes, it is difficult to establish direction of influence or causality (Kramer 2012). This study investigates how source of financial information affects household portfolio allocation decisions using methods that explicitly allow for the endogeneity of seeking financial information and investment decisions. Sources of information investigated include financial planners, brokers, magazines/newspapers/books, internet/online services and family and friends.

Speakers & Presenters
KT

Kyoung Tae Kim

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
MS

Martin Seay

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University
SH

Su Hyun Shin

Assistant Professor, The University of Alabama


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Regal

1:00pm

E2B-Consumer Attitudes Regarding End of Life Charitable Planning
This paper presents results from the first nationally representative study of attitudes regarding end of life charitable planning with detailed respondent information. The upcoming transfer of generational wealth has drawn much attention. The current study adds important context to understanding the charitable component of that transfer. In particular, the importance of childlessness suggests that charitable estate transfers will become increasingly important as the rate of childlessness among older adults in the US will be increasing substantially over the next two decades and beyond. Further, the results provide interesting contrasts in generational attitudes towards estate giving to charitable and religious organizations. Finally, these results provide the first glimpse of information about the charitable estate planning attitudes of those under age 50.

Speakers & Presenters
RN

Russell N. James, III

Professor, Texas Tech University
avatar for Jennifer Lehman

Jennifer Lehman

PhD Student and Associate Instructor, Texas Tech University
I'm a PhD student in the personal financial planning department at Texas Tech University. Current research is on diversity issues in charitable planning. I have JD and MPA degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill. I love road trips and have been to all 50 states.


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Regal

1:00pm

E2C-Donor-Advised Funds: A Review for Consumers, Educators, and Planners
Donor-advised funds are now the most popular charitable giving vehicle for individuals in the United States. This research explores the origin of donor-advised funds, their transition from community foundations to financial services, taxation and policy issues and a framework for future scholarly inquiry. Consumers who give to charitable organizations should understand the advantages and disadvantages of this giving channel and policy makers should be made aware of the non-contemporaneous relationship between charitable giving and distribution to a charitable organization.

Speakers & Presenters
avatar for Ann Woodyard

Ann Woodyard

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Regal

1:00pm

E3 - Oral Session Focus - Family Economics and Socialization
Moderators
avatar for MJ Kabaci

MJ Kabaci

Instructor, Montana State University

Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Roxy

1:00pm

E3A-Financial Correlates in Young Adults’ Choice to Marry, Cohabit or Live apart
To understand how young adults balance two important milestones of young adulthood (i.e., financial self-sufficiency and romantic relationship commitment), it is crucial to differentiate between two distinct dimensions of a relationship: (a) the interpersonal process of the relationship (e.g., love, warmth, affection), and (b) the management process of the relationship (e.g., social norms, structural barriers, legal status). Whereas the extant literature has focused on the interpersonal processes of relationships and finances, the present study focuses on the management process in relationships to examine how finances influence young adults’ choice to marry, cohabit or live apart from their romantic partner.

Speakers & Presenters
JK

Jennifer K. Rea

Graduate Student, University of Minnesota
avatar for Joyce Serido

Joyce Serido

Associate Professor, University of Minnesota
Dr. Joyce Serido is a Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Family Social Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and a leading expert in financial behavior at the intersection of family processes and personal well-being, with particular focus on youth and young adults... Read More →


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Roxy

1:00pm

E3B-The Great Recession and Heterogeneity Within the Hispanic Middle Class
We investigated the size of the Hispanic middle class using the Department of Commerce’s definition and tracked the changes over the Great Recession using 2003-2014 Consumer Expenditure Survey data. We also explored the within group heterogeneity of the Hispanic middle class facing the Great Recession. Our descriptive results showed that the size of the Hispanic middle class shrank after the recession. This erosion is very disconcerting, especially given the increasing share of Hispanics in the demographic makeup and significant contribution to the U.S. economy. Meanwhile, within ethnic group heterogeneity exists in weathering the economic downturn, with Mexicans being more likely to be in middle class than Mexican-Americans during the recession compared with pre-recession. Such findings do not speak to an improvement of economic well-being among Mexicans but possibly a result of the worse-off Mexican immigrants returning to Mexico.

Speakers & Presenters
JX

Jessie X. Fan

Professor, University of Utah
HZ

Hua Zan

Assistant Researcher, University of Hawaii at Manoa


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Roxy

1:00pm

E3C-The Influence of Childhood Experiences on the Financial Capability of Young Adults
Childhood economic conditions influence many outcomes later in life, including human capital formation, economic mobility, and health. Parent and caregiver behavior provide a model for decision making in early adulthood. This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics' (PSID); Child Development and Transition to Adulthood Supplements to analyze the influence of childhood financial experiences and conditions on the ability to manage money in adulthood.   The panel structure of the data allows for analysis of the influence of temporary versus persistent childhood financial conditions. The addition of data on state policy from 1970-2014 that requires or suggests that financial education or economics be taught in high school allow us to estimate the impact of these courses on financial independence and skills as an adult.

Speakers & Presenters
JM

J. Michael Collins

University of Wisconsin, Madison
MR

Madelaine Reid L'Esperance

Doctoral Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison
CA

Cliff A. Robb

Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Roxy

1:00pm

E3D-Bankruptcy Determinants Among U.S. Households During the Peak of the Great Recession
Using the 2007-2009 panel Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF), we explore whether the prevailing wisdom on the determinants of bankruptcy can hold its ground in the wake of a systemic downturn in the U.S. economy. We review the literature on the main causes of filing for personal bankruptcy, then test the relative importance of these causes in a logistic regression framework. Preliminary results suggest that, among demographic characteristics of individuals in the SCF, being younger than 35 is the only factor statistically significantly associated with a lower likelihood of filing for bankruptcy. Further analyses will consider additional possible determinants.

Speakers & Presenters
JB

Jonathan Bauchet

Assistant Professor, Purdue University
DA

David A. Evans

Extension Specialist, Purdue University


Sunday April 23, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Roxy

2:40pm

General Session 5 (Closing): Panel on Data Sets
FDIC National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households - Alicia Lloro
To assess the inclusiveness of the banking system, and in partial response to a statutory mandate, the FDIC has conducted the National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households biennially since 2009. The survey is administered in partnership with the U.S. Census Bureau as a supplement to the Current Population Survey and is representative at the national and state levels. The survey provides estimates of the proportion of U.S. households that do not have an account at an insured institution, and the proportion that have an account but used alternative financial services (e.g., check cashing or payday loans) in the past 12 months. The survey also provides insights that may inform efforts to better meet the needs of these consumers within the banking system. 

National Financial Capability Study Data - Gary Mottola
In consultation with the U.S. Department of the Treasury and President Bush's Advisory Council on Financial Literacy, the FINRA Investor Education Foundation commissioned the first national study of the financial capability of American adults in 2009. The overarching research objectives of the National Financial Capability Study were to benchmark key indicators of financial capability and evaluate how these indicators vary with underlying demographic, behavioral, attitudinal and financial literacy characteristics. The 2012 Study—similarly developed in consultation with the U.S. Department of the Treasury, other federal agencies and President Obama's Advisory Council on Financial Capability—updated key measures from the 2009 Study and deepened the exploration of topics that are highly relevant today. The 2015 Study continues in this vein, and a 2018 wave of the study is currently in the planning stage.

Using the Consumer Expenditure Surveys:  A Large, Rich, Unique, and Free Source of Tables and Microdata Files - Geoffrey Paulin
Sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Consumer Expenditure Surveys (CE) are the most detailed source of expenditures, demographics, and income collected by the Federal government directly from families and households (or, more precisely, “consumer units”).  Every year, the CE program publishes online tables and microdata from its two component surveys (the Quarterly Interview Survey and the Diary Survey), which are used by researchers in a variety of fields, including academia, government, market research, and other private industry areas.  This presentation includes a description of the contents of the tabular and microdata files, as well as a tour of the CE website to demonstrate how to access them.

Finances and Life Success During the Transition to Adulthood - Joyce Serido, Soyeon Shim
This session will describe the format, content, and support available for analyzing longitudinal financial capability data from a single cohort of young adults. Launched in 2008, the Life Success dataset (also known as “APLUS”) examines the influences that shape or guide individual life trajectories — the pathways that emerging adults tread on their way to independence and self-sufficiency.  The Life Success dataset combines family socialization and developmental perspectives to create a framework for examining the process by which young adults develop financial capability (e.g., financial skills, abilities) and its associations with adult life outcomes (e.g., career, family formation, health, well-being).  

Moderators
avatar for MJ Kabaci

MJ Kabaci

Instructor, Montana State University

Speakers & Presenters
AL

Alicia Lloro

National Unbankded and Underbanked Household Survey, FDIC
Alicia Lloro is a Senior Financial Economist in the Division of Depositor and Consumer Protection at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.  Her research interests include econometrics, consumer finance, and transportation economics. Since joining the FDIC in 2013, Alicia has... Read More →
GM

Gary Mottola

Research Director, Investor Education, FINRA
avatar for Geoffrey Paulin

Geoffrey Paulin

Senior Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics
Geoffrey Paulin, Ph.D., is a Senior Economist in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Surveys (CE) program. He has written numerous articles using various aspects of the CE data, which have been published in periodicals such as  Journal of Consumer Affairs, for which he serves as a member of the Editorial Board, Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, and the Monthly Labor... Read More →
avatar for Joyce Serido

Joyce Serido

Associate Professor, University of Minnesota
Dr. Joyce Serido is a Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Family Social Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and a leading expert in financial behavior at the intersection of family processes and personal well-being, with particular focus on youth and young adults... Read More →



Sunday April 23, 2017 2:40pm - 4:00pm
Baldwin

4:00pm

4:00pm

ACCI Board and Conference Committee Meeting
Brief Wrap-up Meeting

Sunday April 23, 2017 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Baldwin